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Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2019 Jan 5. pii: S1542-3565(19)30013-8. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2018.12.040. [Epub ahead of print]

Shorter Disease Duration is Associated With Higher Rates of Response to Vedolizumab in Patients With Crohn's Disease but Not Ulcerative Colitis.

Author information

1
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
2
Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA.
3
University of California - San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
4
Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA.
5
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
6
Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, USA.
7
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
8
Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY, USA.
9
Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc., Deerfield, IL, USA.
10
Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
11
New York University (NYU), New York, NY, USA.
12
North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY, USA.
13
University of Mississippi, Jackson, MS, USA.
14
University of California - San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. Electronic address: pdulai@ucsd.edu.
15
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: ryan.ungaro@mssm.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Patients with Crohn's disease (CD), but not ulcerative colitis (UC), of shorter duration have higher rates of response to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists than patients with longer disease duration. Little is known about the association between disease duration and response to other biologic agents. We aimed to evaluate response of patients with CD or UC to vedolizumab, stratified by disease duration.

METHODS:

We analyzed data from a retrospective, multicenter, consortium of patients with CD (n=650) or UC (n=437) treated with vedolizumab from May 2014 through December 2016. Using time to event analyses, we compared rates of clinical remission, corticosteroid-free remission (CSFR), and endoscopic remission between patients with early-stage (≤2 years duration) and later-stage (>2 years) CD or UC. We used Cox proportional hazards models to identify factors associated with outcomes.

RESULTS:

Within 6 months initiation of treatment with vedolizumab, significantly higher proportions of patients with early-stage CD, vs later-stage CD, achieved clinical remission (38% vs 23%), CSFR (43% vs 14%), and endoscopic remission (29% vs 13%) (P<.05 for all comparisons). After adjusting for disease-related factors including previous exposure to TNF antagonists, patients with early-stage CD were significantly more likely than patients with later-stage CD to achieve clinical remission (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.59; 95% CI, 1.02-2.49), CSFR (aHR, 3.39; 95% CI, 1.66-6.92), and endoscopic remission (aHR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.06-3.39). In contrast, disease duration was not a significant predictor of response among patients with UC.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with CD for 2 years or less are significantly more likely to achieve a complete response, CSFR, or endoscopic response to vedolizumab than patients with longer disease duration. Disease duration does not associate with response vedolizumab in patients with UC.

KEYWORDS:

Inflammatory bowel disease; integrin; monoclonal antibody therapy; time

PMID:
30625408
DOI:
10.1016/j.cgh.2018.12.040
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