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Cleve Clin J Med. 2019 Jan;86(1):39-46. doi: 10.3949/ccjm.86a.17133.

Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: A primary care guide.

Author information

1
Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. khourij@ccf.org.
2
Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA.
3
Clinical Assistant Professor, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.
4
Department of Hematologic Oncology and Blood Disorders, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA.
5
Department of Clinical Pathology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA.
6
Assistant Professor, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.
7
Chairman, Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA.
8
Transplantation Center, and Department of Cancer Biology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA.
9
Professor, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Abstract

Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is commonly diagnosed in outpatients being worked up for an array of clinical concerns. It carries a risk of progression to myeloma and other lymphoproliferative disorders that, albeit low (1% per year), warrants regular follow-up. Patients with MGUS can be risk-stratified on the basis of the amount and type of their monoclonal protein as well as whether they have an abnormal light-chain ratio. Here, we provide a guide to the diagnosis, workup, and management of MGUS.

Comment in

PMID:
30624183
DOI:
10.3949/ccjm.86a.17133
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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