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Vox Sang. 2019 Feb;114(2):145-153. doi: 10.1111/vox.12748. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

The supply chain of migrant blood donors: an organisational interview study.

Author information

1
Department of Donor Medicine Research, Sanquin Research, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
2
Department of Public Health, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
3
Amsterdam School of Communication Research/ASCoR, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
4
Department of Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence, Tilburg University, Tilburg, the Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Migrant blood donors are underrepresented worldwide resulting in shortages of compatible blood products. Prior studies focused on individual barriers and motivators of potential blood donors, but no studies addressed organisational factors of the blood supply chain. This study explored the perceptions and experiences in recruitment and retention of migrant - and potentially rare-blood donors among staff members within the blood supply chain and identified obstacles and solutions in this chain.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The study was conducted at Sanquin, the national blood supply organisation of the Netherlands. Qualitative in-depth interviews were done among key staff members (N = 17). Expert validity was assessed in three feedback meetings.

RESULTS:

Seven staff members believed there is a shortage of migrant blood donors, while five believed there is not. However, there was a consensus that it may become a problem in the future due to demographic changes. The perceived obstacles to recruit and retain migrant donors were difficulties in determining how many migrant donors are needed and recruiting them, excluding potentially rare donors prior to donation, limited use of extended phenotyping and high blood typing and frozen storage costs. The possible solutions to increase blood pool diversity lay in registering donor ethnicity, specialised information provision for donors, reconsidering eligibility criteria and optimising blood typing strategies.

CONCLUSION:

Whilst recruitment of migrant blood donors is perceived by staff as difficult, various organisational policies and guidelines seem to hinder retention. Improvements in the blood supply chain may be achieved by addressing logistics, current procedures and registration of ethnicity.

KEYWORDS:

blood collection; blood processing; donor recruitment; donors

PMID:
30623984
DOI:
10.1111/vox.12748

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