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Indian J Pediatr. 2019 Jan;86(Suppl 1):20-24. doi: 10.1007/s12098-018-2824-8. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Inhaled Foreign Body Impaction: A Review of Literature in Malaysian Children.

Author information

1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
2
Department of ENT, SMS Medical College, Jaipur, India.
3
Unit of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Public Health, Department of Cardiac, Thoracic, Vascular Sciences and Public Health, University of Padua, Padua, Italy.
4
Unit of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Public Health, Department of Cardiac, Thoracic, Vascular Sciences and Public Health, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. dario.gregori@unipd.it.
5
Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery (ENT), Maulana Azad Medical College and Associated Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi, India.

Abstract

Foreign body aspiration in children is a problem that can lead to several complications, including death. In this retrospective publication review from 1970 to 2015, there were altogether 42 Malaysian children below the age of 15 y reported with foreign body (FB) ingestion. There were 31 boys and 11 girls between 2 and 177 mo of age. The incidence of FB ingestion in children varied with dietary practices. Peanut was the most common food-related substance inhaled followed by watermelon seed and coconut kernel. The most common non-food related substances were metal objects (toys, springs, hair clips) and plastic objects (ballpoint tips, pencil caps and whistles). Successful removal of FB by bronchoscopy is achieved in the vast majority of cases except for a case of impacted whistle inhalation and a neglected laryngeal FB which required a tracheostomy. One child required thoracotomy for the removal of a peanut in the right bronchus. The incidence of food-related substance inhalation was more common than non-food related substance (30:7). From this review, the key messages are two: first, prevention can be achieved by educating parents not to allow access to small objects or dangerous foods to children below 3 y age; Second, emergency first aid home measures, in the combination form of back blows in the head down position and chest or abdominal thrusts, should be early performed according to the pediatric age group and can be quite effective.

KEYWORDS:

Children; Choke; Food; Ingestion; Inhaled; Non-food

PMID:
30623311
DOI:
10.1007/s12098-018-2824-8

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