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Indian J Sex Transm Dis AIDS. 2018 Jul-Dec;39(2):98-101. doi: 10.4103/ijstd.IJSTD_103_16.

Study of prevalence of dermatophytes among human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS patients in Shadan Institute of Medical Sciences and Teaching Hospital and Research Centre, Hyderabad, Telangana, India.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology and STD, Shadan Institute of Medical Sciences, Teaching Hospital and Research Centre, Post Graduate Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana, India.

Abstract

Introduction:

The objective of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of dermatophytoses in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients as well as to analyze the influence of CD4+ T-cell level in the Dermatology and STD Outpatient Department of Shadan Institute of Medical Sciences Teaching Hospital and Research Centre, Himayat sagar road, Hyderabad (Telangana state). The patients were tested for dermatophytic infections, as well as for the CD4+ T-cell counts. A total of 120 HIV-seropositive patients were included in this study, among which 38 were diagnosed of dermatophytosis. A majority of patients were in the 21-30 years' age group. Tinea cruris was seen in majority of the cases, with Trichophyton rubrum being the most common culprit.

Background:

Cutaneous fungal infections have been reported worldwide as being one of the most common human infectious diseases in clinical practice. Dermatophytoses in individuals with HIV infection seem to manifest with atypical, multiple, or extensive lesions more frequently.

Aims:

The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of dermatophytic infections among HIV-seropositive patients and their relation with CD4 count.

Materials and Methods:

This single-center prospective study was conducted in all HIV-seropositive patients (by double ELISA methods) who attended the Dermatology and STD Outpatient Department of Shadan Institute of Medical Sciences Teaching Hospital and Research Centre, Himayat sagar road, Hyderabad (Telangana state), from March 2015 to September 2016. They were screened for cutaneous fungal infections and those who tested positive were recruited for this study.

Results:

A total of 120 HIV-seropositive patients were included in this study, among which 38 were diagnosed of dermatophytosis. Most patients were in the 21-30 years' age group. Tinea cruris was the most common variant, and T. rubrum was the most common offending pathogen. It was also found that the CD4+ T-cell count does not influence the occurrence of dermatophytoses.

Conclusion:

Superficial fungal infections are a common yet significant problem in HIV infection. They are characterized by the diversity of clinical aspects; the lesions are mostly caused by T. rubrum. It is essential that optimum treatment should be administered.

KEYWORDS:

Dermatophytes; human immunodeficiency virus; tinea cruris

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