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Leukemia. 2019 Jan 8. doi: 10.1038/s41375-018-0354-z. [Epub ahead of print]

JMJD1C-mediated metabolic dysregulation contributes to HOXA9-dependent leukemogenesis.

Author information

1
Cancer and Stem Cell Biology Group, Children's Cancer Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia.
2
German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
3
German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), partner site Munich, Heidelberg, Germany.
4
Research Unit Apoptosis in Hematopoietic Stem Cells, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Munich, Germany.
5
The Centenary Institute, NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia.
6
Department of Pediatrics, Dr. von Hauner Childrens Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich, Germany.
7
Experimental Leukemia and Lymphoma Research Department of Internal Medicine 3, University Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany.
8
Children's Cancer Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia.
9
Centre for Childhood Cancer Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia.
10
Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research, QEII Medical Centre, Nedlands and Centre for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.
11
Department of Cell, Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Black Family Stem Cell Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA.
12
Cancer and Stem Cell Biology Group, Children's Cancer Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia. jwang@ccia.unsw.edu.au.
13
Centre for Childhood Cancer Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia. jwang@ccia.unsw.edu.au.

Abstract

Abnormal metabolism is a fundamental hallmark of cancer and represents a therapeutic opportunity, yet its regulation by oncogenes remains poorly understood. Here, we uncover that JMJD1C, a jumonji C (JmjC)-containing H3K9 demethylase, is a critical regulator of aberrant metabolic processes in homeobox A9 (HOXA9)-dependent acute myeloid leukemia (AML). JMJD1C overexpression increases in vivo cell proliferation and tumorigenicity through demethylase-independent upregulation of a glycolytic and oxidative program, which sustains leukemic cell bioenergetics and contributes to an aggressive AML phenotype in vivo. Targeting JMJD1C-mediated metabolism via pharmacologic inhibition of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation led to ATP depletion, induced necrosis/apoptosis and decreased tumor growth in vivo in leukemias co-expressing JMJD1C and HOXA9. The anti-metabolic therapy effectively diminished AML stem/progenitor cells and reduced tumor burden in a primary AML patient-derived xenograft. Our data establish a direct link between drug responses and endogenous expression of JMJD1C and HOXA9 in human AML cell line- and patient-derived xenografts. These findings demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for JMJD1C in counteracting adverse metabolic changes and retaining the metabolic integrity during tumorigenesis, which can be exploited therapeutically.

PMID:
30622285
DOI:
10.1038/s41375-018-0354-z

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