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Curr Med Chem. 2019 Jan 7. doi: 10.2174/0929867326666190107163756. [Epub ahead of print]

Management of peripheral neuropathy induced by chemotherapy.

Author information

1
Department of Oncology, Barzilai Medical Center, Ashkelon, and Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva. Israel.
2
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Barzilai Medical Center, Ashkelon, and Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva. Israel.
3
Department of Radiation Therapy, Bad Trissl, Oberaudorf Germany, and Faculty of Medicine, University of Oradea. Romania.
4
Department of Oncology, Barzilai Medical Center, Ashkelon, and Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer. Israel.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is considered a severe side effect of therapeutic agents with limited treatment options. The incidence of CIPN in cancer patients is approximately 3-7% in cytostatic monotherapy and as high as 38% in cases of poly-chemotherapy. The prevalence of CIPN was found to be 68% within the first month of chemotherapy treatment. In some cases, CIPN can resolve, partially or completely, after completion of the treatment; in other cases, it can remain for a long time and affect the patient's quality of life.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study is to present up-to-date data regarding available treatment options for the management of CIPN.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The up-to-date guidelines of ESMO (European Society for Medical Oncology), ASCO (American Society of Clinical Oncology), ONS (Oncology Nursing Society), NCI (National Cancer Institute), and NCCN (National Comprehensive Cancer Network) were reviewed and included in the manuscript.

RESULTS:

The use of tricyclic antidepressant (TCA), selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI), pregabalin, and gabapentin are recommended as first-line treatment. Other treatment options were offered as second and third lines of treatment (lidocaine patches, capsaicin high-concentration patches, tramadol, and strong opioids, respectively); however, lower significance was demonstrated. Inconclusive results were found in the use of cannabinoids, drug combinations, antiepileptics, antidepressants, and topical drugs.

CONCLUSION:

TCA, other antidepressants, and opioids could be recommended as treatment. Yet, we could not recommend an ideal therapeutic agent for the prevention or treatment of CIPN. Therefore, CIPN continues to be a challenge to clinicians and our patients.

KEYWORDS:

CIPN; cannabis; chemotherapy; neuropathy; opioid.

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