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Chemistry. 2019 Feb 26;25(12):3112-3118. doi: 10.1002/chem.201805551. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

FeOOH Nanocubes Anchored on Carbon Ribbons for Use in Li/O2 Batteries.

Author information

1
Siyuan Laboratory, Guangzhou Key Laboratory of, Vacuum Coating Technologies and New Energy Materials, Guangdong Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center of, Vacuum Coating Technologies and New Energy Materials, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Fiber Sensing and Communications, Department of Physics, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 510632, P.R. China.
2
Key Laboratory of Clean Chemical Technology, College of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510006, P.R. China.
3
Instrumental Analysis & Research Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 510275, P.R. China.

Abstract

A composite of FeOOH nanocubes anchored on carbon ribbons has been synthesized and used as a cathode material for Li/O2 batteries. Fe2+ ion-exchanged resin serves as a precursor for both FeOOH nanocubes and carbon ribbons, which are formed simultaneously. The as-prepared FeOOH cubes are proposed to have a core-shell structure, with FeOOH as the shell and Prussian blue as the core, based on information from XPS, TEM, and EDS mapping. As a cathode material for Li/O2 batteries, FeOOH delivers a specific capacity of 14816 mA h g-1 cathode with a cycling stability of 67 cycles over 400 h. The high performance is related to the low overpotential of the oxygen reduction/evolution reaction on FeOOH. The cube structure, the supporting carbon ribbons, and the -OOH moieties all contribute to the low overpotential. The discharge product Li2 O2 can be efficiently decomposed in the FeOOH cathode after a charging process, leading to higher cycling stability. Its high activity and stability make FeOOH a good candidate for use in non-aqueous Li/O2 batteries.

KEYWORDS:

FeOOH; Li/O2 batteries; Prussian blue; carbon; cathode materials; nanostructures

PMID:
30618062
DOI:
10.1002/chem.201805551

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