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Nat Microbiol. 2019 Jan 7. doi: 10.1038/s41564-018-0328-y. [Epub ahead of print]

Characterization of a filovirus (Měnglà virus) from Rousettus bats in China.

Author information

1
CAS Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China.
2
Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.
3
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
4
Guangdong Institute of Applied Biological Resources, Guangzhou, China.
5
Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.
6
Yunnan Institute of Endemic Diseases Control and Prevention, Dali, China.
7
Dali University, Dali, China.
8
Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore. linfa.wang@duke-nus.edu.sg.
9
CAS Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China. zlshi@wh.iov.cn.

Abstract

Filoviruses, especially Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV), are notoriously pathogenic and capable of causing severe haemorrhagic fever diseases in humans with high lethality1,2. The risk of future outbreaks is exacerbated by the discovery of other bat-borne filoviruses of wide genetic diversity globally3-5. Here we report the characterization of a phylogenetically distinct bat filovirus, named Měnglà virus (MLAV). The coding-complete genome of MLAV shares 32-54% nucleotide sequence identity with known filoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis places this new virus between EBOV and MARV, suggesting the need for a new genus taxon. Importantly, despite the low amino acid sequence identity (22-39%) of the glycoprotein with other filoviruses, MLAV is capable of using the Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) as entry receptor. MLAV is also replication-competent with chimeric MLAV mini-genomes containing EBOV or MARV leader and trailer sequences, indicating that these viruses are evolutionally and functionally closely related. Finally, MLAV glycoprotein-typed pseudo-types transduced cell lines derived from humans, monkeys, dogs, hamsters and bats, implying a broad species cell tropism with a high risk of interspecies spillover transmission.

PMID:
30617348
DOI:
10.1038/s41564-018-0328-y

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