Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Schizophr Res. 2019 Jan 3. pii: S0920-9964(18)30721-7. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2018.12.025. [Epub ahead of print]

The influence of religious activity and polygenic schizophrenia risk on religious delusions in schizophrenia.

Author information

1
Institute of Psychiatric Phenomics and Genomics (IPPG), University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich 80336, Germany; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen 37075, Germany. Electronic address: heike.anderson-schmidt@med.uni-goettingen.de.
2
Institute of Psychiatric Phenomics and Genomics (IPPG), University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich 80336, Germany; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen 37075, Germany.
3
Department of Genetic Epidemiology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Georg-August-University, Göttingen 37099, Germany.
4
Institute of Psychiatric Phenomics and Genomics (IPPG), University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich 80336, Germany; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich 80336, Germany.
5
Institute of Psychiatric Phenomics and Genomics (IPPG), University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich 80336, Germany.
6
Institute of Psychiatric Phenomics and Genomics (IPPG), University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich 80336, Germany; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich 80336, Germany; International Max Planck Research School for Translational Psychiatry, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich 80804, Germany.
7
Institute of Psychiatric Phenomics and Genomics (IPPG), University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich 80336, Germany; International Max Planck Research School for Translational Psychiatry, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich 80804, Germany.
8
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen 37075, Germany.
9
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Bezirkskrankenhaus Augsburg, Augsburg 86156, Germany.
10
Department of Psychiatry, Ruhr University Bochum, LWL University Hospital, Bochum 44791, Germany.
11
Department of Psychiatry, Klinikum Bremen-Ost, Bremen 28325, Germany.
12
Department of Psychiatry, Klinikum Bremen-Ost, Bremen 28325, Germany; Karl-Jaspers Clinic, European Medical School Oldenburg-Groningen, Oldenburg 26160, Germany.
13
Karl-Jaspers Clinic, European Medical School Oldenburg-Groningen, Oldenburg 26160, Germany.
14
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapeutic Medicine, Research Unit for Bipolar Affective Disorder, Medical University of Graz, Graz 8036, Austria.
15
Department of Psychiatry, Dr. Fontheim - Mental Health, Liebenburg 38704, Germany.
16
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Agaplesion Diakonieklinikum, Rotenburg 27356, Germany.
17
Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Clinical Center Werra-Meißner, Eschwege 37269, Germany.
18
Asklepios Specialized Hospital, Göttingen 37081, Germany.
19
Psychiatric Hospital Lüneburg, Lüneburg 21339, Germany.
20
AMEOS Clinical Center Osnabrück, Osnabrück 49088, Germany.
21
ASKLEPIOS Specialized Hospital Tiefenbrunn, Rosdorf 37124, Germany.
22
Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Clinical Center Wilhelmshaven, Wilhelmshaven 26389, Germany.
23
Department of Psychiatry II, Ulm University, Bezirkskrankenhaus Günzburg, Günzburg 89312, Germany.
24
AMEOS Clinical Center Hildesheim, Hildesheim 31135, Germany; Center for Systems Neuroscience (ZSN), Hannover 30559, Germany.
25
Department of Translational Psychiatry, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich 80804, Germany.
26
Institute of Human Genetics, University of Bonn School of Medicine & University Hospital Bonn, Bonn 53127, Germany; Department of Genomics, Life & Brain Center, University of Bonn, Bonn 53127, Germany.
27
Department of Genetic Epidemiology in Psychiatry, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim 68159, Germany.
28
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen 37075, Germany; German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Göttingen 37075, Germany; iBiMED, Medical Sciences Department, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal.
29
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich 80336, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Religious delusions are a common symptom in patients experiencing psychosis, with varying prevalence rates of religious delusions across cultures and societies. To enhance our knowledge of this distinct psychotic feature, we investigated the mutually-adjusted association of genetic and environmental factors with occurrence of religious delusions.

METHODS:

We studied 262 adult German patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Association with lifetime occurrence of religious delusions was tested by multiple logistic regression for the following putative predictors: self-reported degree of religious activity, DSM-IV diagnosis, sex, age, education level, marital status, presence of acute delusion at the time of interview and an individual polygenic schizophrenia-risk score (SZ-PRS, available in 239 subjects).

RESULTS:

Of the 262 patients, 101 (39%) had experienced religious delusions. The risk of experiencing religious delusions was significantly increased in patients with strong religious activity compared to patients without religious affiliation (OR = 3.6, p = 0.010). Low or moderate religious activity had no significant effect. The same analysis including the SZ-PRS confirmed the effect of high religious activity on occurrence of religious delusions (OR = 4.1, p = 0.008). Additionally, the risk of experiencing religious delusions increased with higher SZ-PRS (OR 1.4, p = 0.020, using pT = 0.05 for SZ-PRS calculation). None of the other variables were significantly associated with lifetime occurrence of religious delusions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest that strong religious activity and high SZ-PRS are independent risk factors for the occurrence of religious delusions in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.

KEYWORDS:

Religious activity; Religious delusions; Schizoaffective disorder; Schizophrenia; Schizophrenia polygenic risk score

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center