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Vaccine. 2019 Feb 4;37(6):877-881. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.12.037. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Association between social capital and second dose of measles vaccination in Japan: Results from the A-CHILD study.

Author information

1
Department of Global Health Promotion, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan; Institute of Education, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Department of Global Health Promotion, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: fujiwara.hlth@tmd.ac.jp.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Measles vaccination is important to prevent outbreak, and social capital can be an important preventive factor. However, there have been very few studies that investigated the association between social capital and measles vaccination, especially the second dose, which is more likely to be suboptimal. This study aimed to investigate the association between social capital and second dose of measles vaccine.

METHODS:

Data were derived from a population-based study of first-grade elementary school children (6-7 years old) in Adachi City, Tokyo. Caregivers were asked to complete a questionnaire, and 4291 of them provided a valid response (response rate: 80.1%). Among these 4291 valid responses, 69 responses were excluded since variables for social capital measures were missing, which resulted in analytic sample size of 4222. We analyzed the association between measles vaccination and social capital including social ties, social trust and mutual aid by multilevel logistic regression analysis with a random intercept model.

RESULTS:

About 8.9% of the children did not receive a second dose of measles-containing vaccines. After covariates adjustments, increase of one-standard-deviation of poor individual-level social ties showed 11% lower odds of receiving measles-containing vaccines (OR: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.80-0.99). By contrast, no significant association between community-level social ties and measles vaccination was found. Regarding social trust, no significant association between individual-level social trust and measles vaccination was found. However, increase of one-standard-deviation of poor community-level social trust showed 11% lower odds of receiving measles-containing vaccines (OR: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.79-0.998). There was no association between mutual aid and measles vaccination.

CONCLUSION:

Social ties and social trust were associated with second dose of measles vaccination. Fostering social capital may be effective in raising the low rate of second dose of measles vaccine.

KEYWORDS:

Low immunization rate; Low vaccination rate; Measles-containing vaccines; Social capital; Vaccine acceptance; Vaccine hesitancy

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