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Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2019 Mar;118:124-127. doi: 10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.12.027. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Long-term hearing outcomes of children with symptomatic congenital CMV treated with valganciclovir.

Author information

1
University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Utah, United States.
2
University of Utah School of Nursing, Utah, United States.
3
University of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Population Health Sciences, Division of Biostatistics, Utah, United States.
4
University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Utah, United States. Electronic address: albert.park@hsc.utah.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Congenital human cytomegalovirus (cCMV) is a leading cause of pediatric hearing loss. Recent literature has suggested that valganciclovir (VGCV) therapy can improve hearing outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term hearing outcomes among symptomatic CMV patients treated with VGCV.

METHODS:

A retrospective chart review of symptomatic CMV patients treated with VGCV was completed. The primary endpoint was the change in best ear hearing scores prior to treatment and after follow-up audiograms. A paired-sample t-test was used to evaluate the data.

RESULTS:

A total of 16 children were included in the study and participants were followed for an average of 3.2 years. There was a measurable worsening, but not a statistically significant change in the best ear hearing scores, where the mean change was 11.9 dB (p-value = 0.070). However, 14/16 patients (87.5%, p-value<0.001) were found to have clinically significant worsening of hearing. The mean change in hearing scores for the left and right ear was 14.2 dB (p-value = 0.023) and 15.5 dB (p-value = 0.032), respectively. Mean elapsed time for progressive loss was 2.6 ± 0.2 years. When comparing the better or worse ear, there was no pattern for which ear deteriorated earlier or more frequently.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data did show a measurable, but not a statistically significant worsening outcome in best ear hearing. There was a significant change in both left and right ear hearing. Our results suggest that VGCV may provide only a short-term improvement in hearing outcomes; however, these preliminary post-hoc findings suggest the need for a more rigorous evaluation.

KEYWORDS:

CMV; Infection; Pediatric otolaryngology; Sensorineural hearing loss

PMID:
30611098
PMCID:
PMC6363845
[Available on 2020-03-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.12.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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