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AIDS Behav. 2019 Mar;23(3):695-706. doi: 10.1007/s10461-018-02382-8.

Randomized Control Trial of Culturally Adapted Cognitive Processing Therapy for PTSD Substance Misuse and HIV Sexual Risk Behavior for Native American Women.

Author information

1
Indigenous Wellness Research Institute, School of Social Work, University of Washington, Seattle, USA. pearsonc@uw.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
3
Indigenous Wellness Research Institute, School of Social Work, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.

Abstract

An overlooked sequela of HIV risk is trauma exposure, yet few HIV interventions address trauma exposure, mental health, and substance misuse. In a two-arm randomized controlled trial 73 Native American women were randomized to a culturally-adapted Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) or 6-weeks waitlist. Outcomes assessed: PTSD symptom severity, alcohol use frequency, substance abuse or dependence diagnosis, and high-risk sexual behavior defined as vaginal/anal intercourse (a) under the influence of alcohol and/or illicit substances, (b) with a partner who was concurrently sexually active with someone else, and/or (c) with more than one partner in the past 6 weeks. Among immediate intervention participants, compared to waitlist participants, there were large reductions in PTSD symptom severity, high-risk sexual behavior, and a medium-to-large reduction in the frequency of alcohol use. CPT appears to improve mental health and risk behaviors, suggesting that addressing PTSD may be one way of improving HIV-risk related outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

American Indian and Alaska native; Cognitive processing therapy; HIV/AIDS; PTSD; Substance misuse

PMID:
30607757
PMCID:
PMC6407746
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-018-02382-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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