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Int J Med Microbiol. 2018 Dec 30. pii: S1438-4221(18)30541-1. doi: 10.1016/j.ijmm.2018.12.003. [Epub ahead of print]

Phenotypic and molecular characterization of Escherichia albertii: Further surrogates to avoid potential laboratory misidentification.

Author information

1
School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka, Japan; Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka, Japan.
2
School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka, Japan.
3
Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka, Japan.
4
Akita Research Center for Public Health and Environment, Akita, Japan.
5
School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka, Japan; Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka, Japan. Electronic address: shinji@vet.osakafu-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

Escherichia albertii is an emerging gastrointestinal pathogen, related to Escherichia coli, which can be misidentified as enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), due to the presence of the eae gene in E. albertii. The aim of this study was to verify our hypothesis that E. coli cytolethal distending toxin-II (Eccdt-II) gene-positive E. coli is E. albertii and to accumulate the data regarding the bacteriological characteristics of E. albertii. For these purposes, we attempted to detect E. albertii in eae gene-positive bacteria previously identified as E. coli and to examine if re-identified E. albertii contained Eccdt-II-homologous gene and remaining eae gene-positive E. coli did not. A total of 373 eae gene-positive E. coli strains were analyzed by biochemical tests, multilocus sequence analysis and an E. albertii-specific PCR. The strains re-identified as E. albertii were also examined for the presence of cdt genes by using 32P-labled DNA probes, followed by their toxin-typing. Of the 373 strains, 17 were re-identified as E. albertii by three above-mentioned methods. Furthermore, all the 17 re-identified E. albertii possessed cdt genes highly homologous to Eccdt-II and Eacdt genes. Moreover, Eccdt-I or both Eccdt-I and stx2f genes were detected in two re-identified E. albertii strains. However, the remaining 356 strains did not carry such cdt genes. These data indicate that all re-identified E. albertii isolates specifically carried cdt genes homologous to Eccdt-II and Eacdt genes. We suggest that Eccdt-II gene-positive E. coli may be identical to E. albertii.

KEYWORDS:

CDT; E. coli cytolethal distending toxin-II; EPEC; Escherichia albertii; eae

PMID:
30606690
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijmm.2018.12.003

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