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Nat Cell Biol. 2019 Jan;21(1):72-84. doi: 10.1038/s41556-018-0251-8. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Super-resolution microscopy demystified.

Author information

1
Micron Oxford Advanced Bioimaging Unit, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. lothar.schermelleh@bioch.ox.ac.uk.
2
Imaging Core Facility, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
3
Biomolecular Photonics, Department of Physics, University of Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany.
4
MRC Human Immunology Unit and Wolfson Imaging Centre Oxford, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
5
Institute for Applied Optics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena & Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena, Germany.
6
Department of Biotechnology & Biophysics, Biocenter, Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.
7
Advanced Bio-Imaging Program, Bio&Nano Solutions‒LAB3BIO, Bielefeld, Germany. gpcdrummen@bionano-solutions.de.
8
ICON-Europe.org, Exxilon Scientific Events, Steinhagen, Germany. gpcdrummen@bionano-solutions.de.

Abstract

Super-resolution microscopy (SRM) bypasses the diffraction limit, a physical barrier that restricts the optical resolution to roughly 250 nm and was previously thought to be impenetrable. SRM techniques allow the visualization of subcellular organization with unprecedented detail, but also confront biologists with the challenge of selecting the best-suited approach for their particular research question. Here, we provide guidance on how to use SRM techniques advantageously for investigating cellular structures and dynamics to promote new discoveries.

PMID:
30602772
DOI:
10.1038/s41556-018-0251-8

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