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Nat Cell Biol. 2019 Jan;21(1):94-101. doi: 10.1038/s41556-018-0249-2. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

The dynamic nature of senescence in cancer.

Lee S1,2,3, Schmitt CA4,5,6.

Author information

1
Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health; Medical Department of Hematology, Oncology and Tumor Immunology, Virchow Campus, and Molekulares Krebsforschungszentrum, Berlin, Germany.
2
Max-Delbrück-Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association, Berlin, Germany.
3
Deutsches Konsortium für Translationale Krebsforschung (German Cancer Consortium), Partner site Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
4
Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health; Medical Department of Hematology, Oncology and Tumor Immunology, Virchow Campus, and Molekulares Krebsforschungszentrum, Berlin, Germany. clemens.schmitt@charite.de.
5
Max-Delbrück-Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association, Berlin, Germany. clemens.schmitt@charite.de.
6
Deutsches Konsortium für Translationale Krebsforschung (German Cancer Consortium), Partner site Berlin, Berlin, Germany. clemens.schmitt@charite.de.

Abstract

Cellular senescence is implicated in physiological and pathological processes spanning development, wound healing, age-related decline in organ functions and cancer. Here, we discuss cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous properties of senescence in the context of tumour formation and anticancer therapy, and characterize these properties, such as reprogramming into stemness, tissue remodelling and immune crosstalk, as far more dynamic than suggested by the common view of senescence as an irreversible, static condition.

PMID:
30602768
DOI:
10.1038/s41556-018-0249-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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