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J Endocrinol Invest. 2019 Aug;42(8):897-907. doi: 10.1007/s40618-018-0998-6. Epub 2019 Jan 1.

Comparative study of testosterone and vitamin D analogue, elocalcitol, on insulin-controlled signal transduction pathway regulation in human skeletal muscle cells.

Author information

1
Unit of Endocrinology, Department of Movement, Human and Health Sciences, University of Rome "Foro Italico", 00135, Rome, Italy.
2
Department of Radiotherapy, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
3
Department of Experimental Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
4
Unit of Endocrinology, Department of Movement, Human and Health Sciences, University of Rome "Foro Italico", 00135, Rome, Italy. clara.crescioli@uniroma4.it.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Skeletal muscle (Skm) plays a key role in regulating energetic metabolism through glucose homeostasis. Several hormones such as Testosterone (T) and Vitamin D (VD) have been shown to affect energy-dependent cell trafficking by determining Insulin (I)-like effects.

AIM:

To elucidate possible hormone-related differences on muscular metabolic control, we analyzed and compared the effects of T and elocalcitol (elo), a VD analogue, on the activation of energy-dependent cell trafficking, metabolism-related-signal transduction pathways and transcription of gene downstream targets.

METHODS:

Human fetal skeletal muscle cells (Hfsmc) treated with T or elo were analyzed for GLUT4 localization, phosphorylation/activation status of AKT, ERK1/2, IRS-1 signaling and c-MYC protein expression.

RESULTS:

T, similar to elo, induced GLUT4 protein translocation likely in lipid raft microdomains. While both T and elo induced a rapid IRS-1 phosphorylation, the following dynamic in phosphorylation/activation of AKT and ERK1/2 signaling was different. Moreover, T but not elo increased c-MYC protein expression.

CONCLUSIONS:

All together, our evidence indicates that whether both T and elo are able to affect upstream I-like pathway, they differently determine downstream effects in I-dependent cascade, suggesting diverse physiological roles in mediating I-like response in human skeletal muscle.

KEYWORDS:

Elocalcitol; Human skeletal muscle cells; Insulin; Metabolism; Testosterone

PMID:
30600434
DOI:
10.1007/s40618-018-0998-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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