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Cell Mol Life Sci. 2019 Mar;76(5):1005-1025. doi: 10.1007/s00018-018-2998-2. Epub 2019 Jan 1.

Transcriptional repression of the ectodomain sheddase ADAM10 by TBX2 and potential implication for Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Untere Zahlbacher Strasse 8, 55131, Mainz, Germany.
2
Deutsches Institut für Demenz Prävention (DIDP), Neurodegeneration and Neurobiology, Saarland University, Kirrbergerstrasse 1, 66421, Homburg, Saar, Germany.
3
Experimental Neurology, Saarland University, Kirrbergerstrasse 1, 66421, Homburg, Saar, Germany.
4
Institute of Developmental Biology and Neurobiology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Becherweg 32, 55128, Mainz, Germany.
5
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Untere Zahlbacher Strasse 8, 55131, Mainz, Germany. kristina.endres@unimedizin-mainz.de.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The ADAM10-mediated cleavage of transmembrane proteins regulates cellular processes such as proliferation or migration. Substrate cleavage by ADAM10 has also been implicated in pathological situations such as cancer or Morbus Alzheimer. Therefore, identifying endogenous molecules, which modulate the amount and consequently the activity of ADAM10, might contribute to a deeper understanding of the enzyme's role in both, physiology and pathology.

METHOD:

To elucidate the underlying cellular mechanism of the TBX2-mediated repression of ADAM10 gene expression, we performed overexpression, RNAi-mediated knockdown and pharmacological inhibition studies in the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Expression analysis was conducted by e.g. real-time RT-PCR or western blot techniques. To identify the binding region of TBX2 within the ADAM10 promoter, we used luciferase reporter assay on deletion constructs and EMSA/WEMSA experiments. In addition, we analyzed a TBX2 loss-of-function Drosophila model regarding the expression of ADAM10 orthologs by qPCR. Furthermore, we quantified the mRNA level of TBX2 in post-mortem brain tissue of AD patients.

RESULTS:

Here, we report TBX2 as a transcriptional repressor of ADAM10 gene expression: both, the DNA-binding domain and the repression domain of TBX2 were necessary to effect transcriptional repression of ADAM10 in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. This regulatory mechanism required HDAC1 as a co-factor of TBX2. Transcriptional repression was mediated by two functional TBX2 binding sites within the core promoter sequence (- 315 to - 286 bp). Analysis of a TBX2 loss-of-function Drosophila model revealed that kuzbanian and kuzbanian-like, orthologs of ADAM10, were derepressed compared to wild type. Vice versa, analysis of cortical brain samples of AD-patients, which showed reduced ADAM10 mRNA levels, revealed a 2.5-fold elevation of TBX2, while TBX3 and TBX21 levels were not affected.

CONCLUSION:

Our results characterize TBX2 as a repressor of ADAM10 gene expression and suggest that this regulatory interaction is conserved across tissues and species.

KEYWORDS:

ADAM10; APP-processing; Alpha-secretase; Kuzbanian; Omb; TBX2; Transcriptional regulation

PMID:
30599067
DOI:
10.1007/s00018-018-2998-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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