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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2019 Feb;27(2):295-303. doi: 10.1002/oby.22364. Epub 2018 Dec 30.

Influence of Sleep Duration on Postpartum Weight Change in Black and Hispanic Women.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
2
Center for Obesity Research and Education, College of Public Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
3
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
4
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
5
Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
6
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
7
College of Health Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, USA.
8
Weight Watchers International, New York, New York, USA.
9
Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The primary purpose of this study was to examine associations of objectively measured sleep duration with weight changes in black and Hispanic mothers over the first postpartum year.

METHODS:

Data were from 159 mothers (69% black, 32% Hispanic). Nocturnal sleep duration was assessed using wrist actigraphy at 6 weeks and 5 months post partum, examined as a continuous variable and in categories (< 7 vs. ≥ 7 hours/night, consistent with American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommendations). Body weights were abstracted from medical records in pregnancy and measured at 6 weeks, 5 months, and 12 months post partum. Outcomes included early postpartum (6 weeks to 5 months) and late postpartum (5 to 12 months) weight changes.

RESULTS:

The majority of participants slept < 7 hours/night at 6 weeks (75%) and 5 months (63%) post partum. Early postpartum weight change did not differ by 6-week sleep duration category. By contrast, adjusted average late postpartum weight gain (SE) was 1.8 (0.7) kg higher in participants sleeping < 7 hours/night at 5 months post partum compared with those sleeping ≥ 7 hours/night (P = 0.02). Results did not show statistically significant associations of continuous measures of sleep duration, nor of measures of sleep quality, with postpartum weight changes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sleeping < 7 hours/night was associated with late postpartum weight gain in minority mothers.

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