Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Transl Oncol. 2018 Dec 28;12(3):513-522. doi: 10.1016/j.tranon.2018.12.004. [Epub ahead of print]

Cannabidiol Affects Extracellular Vesicle Release, miR21 and miR126, and Reduces Prohibitin Protein in Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells.

Author information

1
Cellular and Molecular Immunology Research Centre, School of Human Sciences, London Metropolitan University, London, UK. Electronic address: uchini22@hotmail.co.uk.
2
Cancer Research Group, School of Life Sciences, University of Westminster, London, UK. Electronic address: P.onganer@westminster.ac.uk.
3
Research Centre for Optimal Health, School of Life Sciences, University of Westminster, London, UK. Electronic address: amy.maclatchy@my.westminster.ac.uk.
4
Research Centre for Optimal Health, School of Life Sciences, University of Westminster, London, UK. Electronic address: rhys.mould@my.westminster.ac.uk.
5
Research Centre for Optimal Health, School of Life Sciences, University of Westminster, London, UK. Electronic address: alistair.nunn@btconnect.com.
6
GW Research, Sovereign House, Vision Park, Cambridge, CB24 9BZ, UK. Electronic address: gwg@chedingtoncourt.co.uk.
7
The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, UK. Electronic address: igor.kraev@open.ac.uk.
8
The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, UK. Electronic address: nicholas.chatterton@open.ac.uk.
9
Research Centre for Optimal Health, School of Life Sciences, University of Westminster, London, UK. Electronic address: l.thomas3@westminster.ac.uk.
10
Extracellular Vesicle Research Unit and Biosciences Research Group, School of Life and Medical Sciences, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, UK. Electronic address: j.inal@herts.ac.uk.
11
Research Centre for Optimal Health, School of Life Sciences, University of Westminster, London, UK. Electronic address: J.Bell@westminster.ac.uk.
12
Tissue Architecture and Regeneration Research Group, School of Life Sciences, University of Westminster, London, UK. Electronic address: S.lange@westminster.ac.uk.

Abstract

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary malignant brain tumor in adults, with poor prognosis. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are key-mediators for cellular communication through transfer of proteins and genetic material. Cancers, such as GBM, use EV release for drug-efflux, pro-oncogenic signaling, invasion and immunosuppression; thus the modulation of EV release and cargo is of considerable clinical relevance. As EV-inhibitors have been shown to increase sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapy, and we recently showed that cannabidiol (CBD) is such an EV-modulator, we investigated whether CBD affects EV profile in GBM cells in the presence and absence of temozolomide (TMZ). Compared to controls, CBD-treated cells released EVs containing lower levels of pro-oncogenic miR21 and increased levels of anti-oncogenic miR126; these effects were greater than with TMZ alone. In addition, prohibitin (PHB), a multifunctional protein with mitochondrial protective properties and chemoresistant functions, was reduced in GBM cells following 1 h CBD treatment. This data suggests that CBD may, via modulation of EVs and PHB, act as an adjunct to enhance treatment efficacy in GBM, supporting evidence for efficacy of cannabinoids in GBM.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center