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Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Dec;97(52):e13758. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000013758.

A novel mutation of SGSH and clinical features analysis of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Affiliated Hospital of Inner Mongolia Medical University.
2
Key Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, Inner Mongolia Medical University.
3
Department of Gastroenterology, Affiliated Hospital of Inner Mongolia Medical University, Hohhot, P.R. China.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and imaging features of a pediatric patient with mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS IIIA) and a novel mutation of the N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH) in 1 pedigree.

PATIENT CONCERNS:

An 8-year-old female patient presented with developmental regression, seizures, cerebral atrophy, thickened calvarial diploe, apathy, esotropia, slender build, thick hair, prominent eyebrows, hepatomegaly, ankle clonus, muscle and joint contractures, and funnel chest.

DIAGNOSES:

The patient was diagnosed as autosomal recessive (AR) MPS IIIA with a novel mutation in the SGSH gene.

INTERVENTIONS:

Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology was used to detect pathogenic genes, and the Sanger method was applied to perform pedigree verification for the detected suspicious pathogenic mutations.

OUTCOMES:

The NGS done for the girl and her family showed 2 variations that were both missense mutations in SGSH. The c.1298G > A (p.Arg433Gln) was a known mutation, and the c.630 G > T (p.Trp210Cys) was a novel variation.

LESSONS:

The common clinical manifestations of MPS IIIA were rapid developmental regression, seizures, cerebral atrophy, and thickened calvarial diploe. The results showed that the c.630 G > T was likely pathogenic according to bioinformatics analysis, which probably was a novel mutation. This study reports 1 case of MPS IIIA with some clinical features as determined via clinical and genetic analysis, and found a new mutation in the SGSH gene.

PMID:
30593151
PMCID:
PMC6314651
DOI:
10.1097/MD.0000000000013758
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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