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Biosens Bioelectron. 2019 Feb 15;127:45-49. doi: 10.1016/j.bios.2018.12.016. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Sensitive detection of chloramphenicol based on Ag-DNAzyme-mediated signal amplification modulated by DNA/metal ion interaction.

Author information

1
Department of Food Science and Engineering, College of Light Industry and Food Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037, PR China.
2
State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Life Sciences, Department of Biochemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, PR China.
3
State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Life Sciences, Department of Biochemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, PR China; Center for Molecular Recognition and Biosensing, School of Life Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, PR China. Electronic address: genxili@nju.edu.cn.

Abstract

We here report a novel method for antibiotic detection by making use of DNA/metal ion interaction coupled with Ag-DNAzyme cleavage-mediated signal amplification. Taking the analysis of chloramphenicol (CAP) as an example, upon the specific recognition between the antibiotic CAP and its aptamer, the secondary structure of the DNA aptamer shaped by C-Ag+-C base mismatches will be altered, liberating the pre-captured Ag+. Subsequently, the free Ag+ provided as a cofactor can activate the Ag-DNAzyme, which behaves recycled cleavage of substrate DNA on the electrode surface for signal amplification. The more CAP is present, the more Ag+ is released, thus more Ag-DNAzyme can be activated to achieve a higher electrochemical signal. Therefore, the target-responsive variation of electrochemical signal enables the sensitive detection of CAP. The proposed method is cost-effective only with plain metal ion as modulator. It has also been challenged with real food samples, indicating the potential to be a promising tool for food safety detection.

KEYWORDS:

Ag-DNAzyme; CAP; DNA/metal ion interaction; Food safety

PMID:
30590222
DOI:
10.1016/j.bios.2018.12.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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