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J Glob Oncol. 2018 Dec;(4):1-7. doi: 10.1200/JGO.18.00180.

Barriers and Opportunities of Oncofertility Practice in Nine Developing Countries and the Emerging Oncofertility Professional Engagement Network.

Author information

1
1 Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.
2
2 National Research Center, Cairo, Egypt.
3
3 Pregna Medicina Reproductiva, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
4
4 Universidad de Valparaiso, Valparaiso, Chile.
5
5 Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico.
6
6 Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, India.
7
7 Mother and Child Hospital, New Delhi, India.
8
8 Private Fertility and Endoscopy Clinic, Bangalore, India.
9
9 Vitalab Fertility Centre, Johannesburg, South Africa.
10
10 University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
11
11 Procrearte, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
12
12 Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Bogota, Colombia.
13
13 Instituto Guatemalteco de Seguridad Social, Guatemala City, Guatemala.
14
14 Thuriah Medical Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
15
15 The Oncology and Fertility Centres of Ekocorp, Eko Hospitals, Lagos, Nigeria.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Oncofertility practice continues to grow in developing countries despite the lack of health care services, especially those related to cancer care. The purpose of this study is to further explore oncofertility practice in these countries and identify opportunities for field-wide coalescence.

METHODS:

We generated a survey to learn more about oncofertility practice in nine developing countries within our Oncofertility Consortium Global Partners Network-Mexico, Colombia, Guatemala, Argentina, Chile, Nigeria, South Africa, Saudi Arabia, and India. Their responses were collected, reviewed, and discussed.

RESULTS:

Surveyed centers from the nine developing countries continue to experience a similar set of common challenges, including a lack of awareness among providers and patients, cultural and religious constraints, lack of insurance coverage and funding to help to support oncofertility programs, and high out-of-pocket costs for patients. Despite these barriers, many opportunities exist and there is great potential for the future.

CONCLUSION:

The current need is to unify the new technologies and best practices that emerge from rural communities and developing countries with those in large metropolitan cities, both domestically (US based) and abroad, into a functional unit: the Oncofertility Professional Engagement Network. The Oncofertility Professional Engagement Network will bridge the gap between domestic and international programs to establish a strong global network in which members share resources, methodologies and experiences and further build cultural competency.

PMID:
30589596
DOI:
10.1200/JGO.18.00180

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