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J Athl Train. 2018 Dec 27. doi: 10.4085/1062-6050-344-17. [Epub ahead of print]

A 4-Week Multimodal Intervention for Individuals With Chronic Ankle Instability: Examination of Disease-Oriented and Patient-Oriented Outcomes.

Author information

1
Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation, Indiana State University, Terre Haute.
2
Division of Athletic Training, University of Kentucky, Lexington.
3
Athletic Training and Physical Therapy, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI) experience disease- and patient-oriented impairments that contribute to both immediate and long-term health detriments. Investigators have demonstrated the ability of targeted interventions to improve these impairments. However, the combined effects of a multimodal intervention have not been evaluated for their effects on a multidimensional profile of health.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the effects of a 4-week rehabilitation program on disease- and patient-oriented impairments associated with CAI.

DESIGN:

Controlled laboratory study.

SETTING:

Laboratory.

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:

Twenty adults (5 males, 15 females; age = 24.35 ± 6.95 years, height = 169.29 ± 10.10 cm, mass = 70.58 ± 12.90 kg) with self-reported CAI participated. Inclusion criteria were at least 1 previous ankle sprain, at least 2 episodes of "giving way" in the 3 months before the study, and a Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score ≤24.

INTERVENTION(S):

Individuals participated in 12 sessions over 4 weeks that consisted of balance training, ankle strengthening, and joint mobilizations. They also completed home ankle-strengthening and -stretching exercises daily.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Dorsiflexion range of motion (weight-bearing-lunge test), isometric ankle strength (inversion, eversion, dorsiflexion, plantar flexion), isometric hip strength (abduction, adduction, flexion, extension), dynamic postural control (Y-Balance test), static postural control (eyes-open and -closed time to boundary in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions), and patient-reported outcomes (Foot and Ankle Ability Measure-Activities of Daily Living and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure-Sport, modified Disablement in the Physically Active scale physical and mental summary components, and Fear-Avoidance Belief Questionnaire-Physical Activity and Fear-Avoidance Belief Questionnaire-Work) were assessed at 4 times (baseline, preintervention, postintervention, 2-week follow-up).

RESULTS:

Dorsiflexion range of motion, each direction of the Y-Balance test, 4-way ankle strength, hip-adduction and -extension strength, the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure-Activities of Daily Living score, the modified Disablement in the Physically Active scale-physical summary component score, and the Fear-Avoidance Belief Questionnaire-Physical Activity score were improved at postintervention ( P < .001; effect-size range = 0.72-1.73) and at the 2-week follow-up ( P < .001; effect-size range = 0.73-1.72) compared with preintervention. Hip-flexion strength was improved at postintervention compared with preintervention ( P = .03; effect size = 0.61). Hip-abduction strength was improved at the 2-week follow-up compared with preintervention ( P = .001, effect size = 0.96). Time to boundary in the anterior-posterior direction was increased at the 2-week follow-up compared with preintervention ( P < .04; effect-size range = 0.61-0.78) and postintervention ( P < .04) during the eyes-open condition.

CONCLUSION:

A 4-week rehabilitation program improved a multidimensional profile of health in participants with CAI.

KEYWORDS:

balance training; dorsiflexion; manual therapy; postural control; self-reported function; strength

PMID:
30589387
DOI:
10.4085/1062-6050-344-17

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