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Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl. 2018 Nov-Dec;29(6):1395-1402. doi: 10.4103/1319-2442.248286.

Urinary schistosomiasis in Boko Haram-related internally displaced Nigerian children.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, College of Medical Sciences, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria.
2
Department of Medicine, College of Medical Sciences, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria.
3
Department of Microbiology, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria.
4
Ramat Library, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria.
5
Pediatric Nephrology and Hypertension Unit, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria.

Abstract

We aimed to determine the prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis among internally displaced children in Maiduguri, Nigeria. Data on the children's sociodemographic characteristics and risk factors for schistosomiasis were collected, over a period of six months, using an interview-based questionnaire. Ten milliliter of urine sample was collected from each child and investigated for hematuria and ova of Schistosoma haematobium. Two hundred and thirty-eight of 385 children had urinary schistosomiasis (62.0%); of this, 125 (53.0%) were males, with a male:female ratio of 1.1:1. Urinary schistosomiasis was the most common among 5-9 years' age group, low social class children, and children of farmers, P <0.05. Stunting was significantly associated with urinary schistosomiasis, P <0.05. It is concluded that urinary schistosomiasis in children was more frequently associated with stunting and low social class. It was a very common disease among internally displaced children in Nigeria.

PMID:
30588972
DOI:
10.4103/1319-2442.248286
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