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Clin Ophthalmol. 2018 Dec 12;12:2575-2579. doi: 10.2147/OPTH.S187949. eCollection 2018.

Effect of bilberry extract on slowing high-myopia progression in children: 2-year follow-up study.

Author information

1
Ophthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Minia University, El-Minya, Egypt, ismailmoftah1@yahoo.com.

Abstract

Aim:

To evaluate the effect of oral Difrarel on progression of high myopia in children and to study myopia course after its discontinuation.

Methods:

A total of 64 highly myopic children were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into two equal groups: group 1 was administered Difrarel for 1 year and stopped its intake for another year, and group 2 (control) did not take Difrarel. Refraction and axial length of the right eye of every subject were measured every 6 months in both groups.

Results:

Each group had 32 eyes of 32 patients. The mean age was 9.34±2.27 years in group 1 and 9.33±2.2 years in group 2. Mean refraction and axial length at the start of the study were -10.78±2.6 D and 23.7±1.2 mm, respectively, in group 1, and -10.5±2.55 D and 23.9±1.4 mm in group 2. Refraction and axial length measurements every 6 months revealed statistically significant lower numbers in group 1 than group 2 after 1 year. After discontinuation of the drug, the difference between both groups remained significant.

Conclusion:

Oral Difrarel slowed axial elongation and stopped myopia progression in children with high myopia. The drug effect was consistent after its discontinuation for 1 year.

KEYWORDS:

Difrarel; axial myopia; high myopia in children; progressive myopia

Conflict of interest statement

Disclosure The author reports no conflicts of interest in this work.

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