Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Viruses. 2018 Dec 26;11(1). pii: E14. doi: 10.3390/v11010014.

Wildlife Management Practices Associated with Pathogen Exposure in Non-Native Wild Pigs in Florida, U.S.

Author information

1
Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. carrmandie@gmail.com.
2
Present Address: Biology Department, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225, USA. carrmandie@gmail.com.
3
United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services, Gainesville, FL 32641, USA. michael.p.milleson@aphis.usda.gov.
4
Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. fhernandeu@uc.cl.
5
School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32601, USA. fhernandeu@uc.cl.
6
Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32603, USA. hmerrill@ufl.edu.
7
United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services, Gainesville, FL 32641, USA. gibs8387@gmail.com.
8
Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. wisely@ufl.edu.

Abstract

Land use influences disease emergence by changing the ecological dynamics of humans, wildlife, domestic animals, and pathogens. This is a central tenet of One Health, and one that is gaining momentum in wildlife management decision-making in the United States. Using almost 2000 serological samples collected from non-native wild pigs (Sus scrofa) throughout Florida (U.S.), we compared the prevalence and exposure risk of two directly transmitted pathogens, pseudorabies virus (PrV) and Brucella spp., to test the hypothesis that disease emergence would be positively correlated with one of the most basic wildlife management operations: Hunting. The seroprevalence of PrV-Brucella spp. coinfection or PrV alone was higher for wild pigs in land management areas that allowed hunting with dogs than in areas that culled animals using other harvest methods. This pattern did not hold for Brucella alone. The likelihood of exposure to PrV, but not Brucella spp., was also significantly higher among wild pigs at hunted sites than at sites where animals were culled. By failing to consider the impact of dog hunting on the emergence of non-native pathogens, current animal management practices have the potential to affect public health, the commercial livestock industry, and wildlife conservation.

KEYWORDS:

Aujeszky’s disease; Brucella spp.; brucellosis; harvest-disease dynamics; landscape epidemiology; pathogen emergence; pseudorabies virus; wild pigs; wildlife disease management

PMID:
30587789
PMCID:
PMC6356989
DOI:
10.3390/v11010014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center