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Expert Rev Vaccines. 2019 Feb;18(2):191-204. doi: 10.1080/14760584.2019.1562907. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Enhancing uptake of influenza maternal vaccine.

Ellingson MK1, Dudley MZ2,3, Limaye RJ2,3,4,5, Salmon DA2,3,5, O'Leary ST6,7, Omer SB1,8,9,10.

Author information

1
a Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health , Emory University , Atlanta , GA , USA.
2
b Department of International Health , Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health , Baltimore , MD , USA.
3
c Institute for Vaccine Safety , Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health , Baltimore , MD , USA.
4
d Department of Epidemiology , Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health , Baltimore , MD , USA.
5
e Department of Health, Behavior and Society , Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health , Baltimore , MD , USA.
6
f Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science , University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Children's Hospital , Aurora , CO , USA.
7
g Department of Pediatrics , University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus , Aurora , CO , USA.
8
h Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health , Emory University , Atlanta , GA , USA.
9
i Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine , Emory University , Atlanta , GA , USA.
10
j Emory Vaccine Center , Emory University , Atlanta , GA , USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Influenza vaccination during pregnancy can offer many benefits to both mother and infant. Despite recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, vaccine coverage rates among pregnant women during pregnancy are below 40% in the United States. There is a need for a greater understanding of what interventions can improve vaccine uptake among pregnant women.

AREAS COVERED:

This review synthesizes the existing evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to improve maternal influenza vaccine uptake. These interventions are examined within the framework of the three psychological propositions: thoughts and feelings, social processes and changing behavior directly.

EXPERT COMMENTARY:

A number of promising and effective interventions were identified in this review. Nudge-based interventions that build on favorable intentions to vaccinate such as provider prompts and standing orders have demonstrated significant success in improving influenza vaccine uptake. However, substantial gaps in the literature still exist. Provider recommendations are the most important predictor of vaccine receipt among pregnant women, yet few studies evaluated intervening to improve the dialogue between patient and provider. With the potential for even more vaccines to be added to the maternal immunization schedule, it is vitally important to understand how to improve uptake.

KEYWORDS:

Influenza; interventions; maternal immunization; pregnancy; vaccination; vaccine

PMID:
30587042
PMCID:
PMC6378696
[Available on 2020-02-01]
DOI:
10.1080/14760584.2019.1562907
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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