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Ann Agric Environ Med. 2018 Dec 20;25(4):635-641. doi: 10.26444/aaem/76321. Epub 2017 Oct 3.

Association between dietary patterns and cardiovascular risk factors in a selected population of Lower Silesia (PURE Study Poland).

Author information

1
Department of Dietetics, Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland. anna.czekajlo@umed.wroc.pl.
2
Department of Dietetics, Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland. dorota.rozanska@umed.wroc.pl.
3
Department of Social Medicine, Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland. kzatonska@gmail.com.
4
Department of Angiology, Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland; Department of Internal Medicine, 4th Military Hospital, Wroclaw, Poland. szubaA@yahoo.com.
5
Department of Dietetics, Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland. bozena.regulska-ilow@umed.wroc.pl.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Dietary pattern analysis is used to describe the dietary habits of a selected population. In many studies, dietary patterns (DPs) have been associated with risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of the study was to assess the association between dietary patterns identified in the population of Lower Silesia, Poland, with anthropometric and biochemical risk factors for CVD.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

The study group included 2,025 participants of the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiological (PURE) Study. Dietary intake was evaluated based on data from the Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). Dietary patterns were derived using principal component analysis (PCA). The relationship between DPs and body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-hip ratio, blood pressure, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides and fasting glucose level, was assessed.

RESULTS:

Three dietary patterns identified in the study explained 35.6% of total variance. The 'fruit, vegetables & dairy' DP, characterized by a high intake of vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, raisins, milk and low-fat dairy, was associated with improved lipid profile and anthropometric measures, lower diastolic blood pressure and lower fasting glucose concentration. 'Traditional' and 'fat & sugar' DPs were unfavourably associated with most of the risk factors for CVD presented in this study.

CONCLUSIONS:

Dietary patterns identified in this study were differently related to selected anthropometric and biochemical risk factors for CVD. 'Fruit, vegetables & dairy' DP was favourably associated with the biochemical and anthropometric CVD risk factors, and was characterized by higher nutritional value in comparison with 'traditional' and 'fat & sugar' DPs.

KEYWORDS:

Risk factors; cardiovascular diseases; dietary patterns; principal component analysis

PMID:
30586977
DOI:
10.26444/aaem/76321
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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