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Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2018 Dec 24. doi: 10.1002/ijgo.12724. [Epub ahead of print]

Delphi consensus statement on intrapartum fetal monitoring in low-resource settings.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
2
Julius Global Health, Julius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mnazi Mmoja Hospital, Zanzibar, Tanzania.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
5
Global Health Section, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
6
School of Health and Medical Science, State University of Zanzibar, Zanzibar, Tanzania.
7
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa.
8
FIGO Committee Safe Motherhood and Newborn Health, FIGO, London, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine acceptable and achievable strategies of intrapartum fetal monitoring in busy low-resource settings.

METHODS:

Three rounds of online Delphi surveys were conducted between January 1 and October 31, 2017. International experts with experience in low-resource settings scored the importance of intrapartum fetal monitoring methods.

RESULTS:

71 experts completed all three rounds (28 midwives, 43 obstetricians). Consensus was reached on (1) need for an admission test, (2) handheld Doppler for intrapartum fetal monitoring, (3) intermittent auscultation (IA) every 30 minutes for low-risk pregnancies during the first stage of labor and after every contraction for high-risk pregnancies in the second stage, (4) contraction monitoring hourly for low-risk pregnancies in the first stage, and (5) adjunctive tests. Consensus was not reached on frequency of IA or contraction monitoring for high-risk women in the first stage or low-risk women in the second stage of labor.

CONCLUSION:

There is a gap between international recommendations and what is physically possible in many labor wards in low-resource settings. Research on how to effectively implement the consensus on fetal assessment at admission and use of handheld Doppler during labor and delivery is crucial to support staff in achieving the best possible care in low-resource settings.

KEYWORDS:

Admission test; Fetal monitoring; Guidelines; Intermittent auscultation; Low- and middle-income countries; Low-resource settings

PMID:
30582153
DOI:
10.1002/ijgo.12724

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