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J Psychiatr Res. 2019 Mar;110:24-30. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2018.12.018. Epub 2018 Dec 15.

Trait-level facets of impulsivity and momentary, naturalistic eating behavior in children and adolescents with overweight/obesity.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University/The Miriam Hospital, Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center, 196 Richmond St., Providence, RI, 02903, USA. Electronic address: andrea_goldschmidt@brown.edu.
2
Sanford Research, 120 8th St. South, Fargo, ND, 58103, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 1919 Elm St. North, Fargo, ND, 58102, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA; Department of Psychology, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3424 South State St., Chicago, IL, 60616, USA.
4
Department of Psychology, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3424 South State St., Chicago, IL, 60616, USA.

Abstract

Impulsivity, and specific subdomains of inhibitory control and reward sensitivity, are trait-level factors that have been implicated in the onset and maintenance of pediatric obesity and disordered eating, but their associations with real-world eating behavior are unknown. We investigated associations of these trait-level constructs with naturalistic, momentary measures of loss of control (LOC) eating and overeating severity in a heterogeneous sample of youth (n = 40), aged 8-14y, with overweight/obesity. Self-report, parent-report, and behavioral data on trait-level impulsivity, reward sensitivity, and inhibitory control, respectively, were collected in the context of a 14-day ecological momentary assessment (EMA) protocol in which participants reported on their eating behavior, mood, hunger, and palatability of foods consumed in real-time. Generalized estimating equations revealed that more perseverative errors on a behavioral measure of visuomotor processing speed and a lower self-reported tendency to act without thinking (at a trend level) were related to greater overall LOC severity. Momentary associations between negative affect and LOC severity were stronger among individuals with greater perseverative errors. Results suggest that trait-level facets of impulsivity may directly influence an individual's tendency to engage in dysregulated eating behaviors, and may also impact susceptibility to state-level factors associated with occurrence of these behaviors. Momentary interventions for LOC eating may require tailoring to address temperamental factors related to impulsivity and inhibitory control.

KEYWORDS:

Ecological momentary assessment; Impulsivity; Loss of control eating; Obesity; Overeating; Reward sensitivity

PMID:
30580080
PMCID:
PMC6360116
[Available on 2020-03-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpsychires.2018.12.018

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