Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Eat Disord. 2018 Dec 22. doi: 10.1002/eat.23000. [Epub ahead of print]

Weight gain trajectories during outpatient family-based treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, The University of North Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota.
3
Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center/The Miriam Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, California.
5
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Neuroscience, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (Emeritus).

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Given that weight gain patterns in adolescents receiving outpatient Family-Based Treatment (FBT) have not been characterized, the purpose of this study was to examine trajectories of weight gain in a group of adolescent patients with a restrictive eating disorder [e.g., anorexia nervosa (AN) and atypical AN] receiving FBT. This study also examined the association of patient characteristics with weight gain trajectories, including age, diagnosis, weight suppression, presenting BMI-for-age percentile, and eating pathology.

METHOD:

Latent growth mixture modeling was used to identify distinct weight trajectories, as defined by change in BMI-for-age percentile, for 153 adolescents with AN or atypical AN, receiving FBT.

RESULTS:

There were five distinct weight gain trajectory profiles for adolescents receiving FBT for a restrictive eating disorder. Younger age and greater weight suppression were associated with more rapid weight gain trajectories. A pattern of slow and consistent weight gain was associated with older age and less eating pathology.

DISCUSSION:

There was considerable variability in weight gain trajectories in youth receiving outpatient FBT for a restrictive eating disorder. This suggests that patients' presenting information can be used to inform expectations regarding weight gain trajectories.

KEYWORDS:

adolescent; anorexia nervosa; feeding and eating disorders; weight gain; weight suppression

PMID:
30578648
DOI:
10.1002/eat.23000

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center