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Indian J Ophthalmol. 2019 Jan;67(1):109-115. doi: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_703_18.

Clinical and electrophysiological results of eye muscle surgery in 17 patients with downbeat nystagmus.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, The Considine Research Institute and The Children's Vision Center, Akron Children's Hospital, Akron; Department of Surgery, The Northeastern Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, Ohio, USA.
2
Department of Ophthalmology, Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

Abstract

Purpose:

To test the hypothesis that eye muscle surgery in treatment of patients with acquired downbeat nystagmus results in improvement measures of visual and ocular motor function.

Methods:

This is a prospective, interventional case series analysis of clinical and electrophyisological data before and after eye muscle surgery in 17 patients with acquired downbeat nystagmus who did not respond to medical treatments. Outcome measures included: 1) routine demography and clinical characteristics, 2) subjective oscillopsia (SO), 3) binocular best-corrected visual acuity in the null position (BVA), 3) primary position strabismic deviation (SD), 5) anomalous head posture (AHP), 6) contrast sensitivity function (CS), and 7) nystagmus slow phase velocity (SPV). All patients were followed at least 12 months. Parametric and non-parametric statistical analysis of outcome measure data above pre- and post-treatment were perfomed using standard software on grouped data using computerized software.

Results:

Patients' age ranged from 5 to 85 years (average 27 years). About 59% were male. Follow up ranged from 1-10 years (average 2.0 years). Around 70% had an associated central nervous systemic diagnosis, 100% had an AHP, oscillopsia and decreased CS, 53% had other eye disease, and 59% had strabismus. There were no complications from surgery. There were signficant post-treatment improvements in mean/median group BVA, SO, SD, AHP, CS, and SPV.

Conclusion:

This study supports the hypothesis that eye muscle surgery as treatments for patients with acquired downbeat nystagmus can result in improvements in multiple aspects of ocular motor and visual functions.

KEYWORDS:

Downbeat nystagmus; eye muscle surgery; vision rehabilitation

PMID:
30574904
DOI:
10.4103/ijo.IJO_703_18
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