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Brain Struct Funct. 2018 Dec 19. doi: 10.1007/s00429-018-1817-8. [Epub ahead of print]

Concurrent analysis of white matter bundles and grey matter networks in the chimpanzee.

Author information

1
Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging, Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain (FMRIB), Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, John Radcliffe Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 9DU, UK. rogier.mars@ndcn.ox.ac.uk.
2
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. rogier.mars@ndcn.ox.ac.uk.
3
Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Sackler Institute for Translational Neurodevelopment, London, UK.
4
Department of Neuroimaging, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, Sackler Institute for Translational Neurodevelopment, London, UK.
5
MRC Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, King's College London, London, UK.
6
Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, Centre for the Developing Brain, St Thomas' Hospital, King's College London, London, UK.
7
Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
8
Marcus Autism Center, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
9
Departments of Radiology and Neuroscience, Washington University Medical School, Saint Louis, MO, USA.
10
Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging, Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain (FMRIB), Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, John Radcliffe Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 9DU, UK.
11
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Understanding the phylogeny of the human brain requires an appreciation of brain organization of our closest animal relatives. Neuroimaging tools such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow us to study whole-brain organization in species which can otherwise not be studied. Here, we used diffusion MRI to reconstruct the connections of the cortical hemispheres of the chimpanzee. This allowed us to perform an exploratory analysis of the grey matter structures of the chimpanzee cerebral cortex and their underlying white matter connectivity profiles. We identified a number of networks that strongly resemble those found in other primates, including the corticospinal system, limbic connections through the cingulum bundle and fornix, and occipital-temporal and temporal-frontal systems. Notably, chimpanzee temporal cortex showed a strong resemblance to that of the human brain, providing some insight into the specialization of the two species' shared lineage.

KEYWORDS:

Brain organization; Comparative; Connectivity; Diffusion MRI; Frontal cortex; Great ape; Limbic system; Networks; Temporal cortex; Tractography

PMID:
30569281
DOI:
10.1007/s00429-018-1817-8

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