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PLoS One. 2018 Dec 18;13(12):e0208877. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0208877. eCollection 2018.

Association of low back load with low back pain during static standing.

Author information

1
Rehabilitation Center, Tochigi Medical Association Shiobara Spa Hospital, Nasushiobara-shi, Tochigi, Japan.
2
Faculty of Medical Technology, Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics and Assistive Technology, Niigata University of Health and Welfare, Kita-ku, Niigata-shi, Niigata, Japan.
3
Department of Medical Research and Management for Musculoskeletal Pain, 22nd Century Medical and Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although poor standing posture is a known cause of low back pain, the mechanisms involved are unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the kinetic and posture angle features of standing posture that might influence low back pain.

METHODS:

Sixty-seven young men were enrolled in this cross-sectional case-control study and were categorized according to whether they did or did not have low back pain. Habitual standing posture was assessed in each group, using a three-dimensional motion analysis system, force plates, and a spinal mouse. Kinetic and posture angle factors were compared between participants with and without low back pain. The relationship between specific features of standing posture and low back pain was analyzed using logistic regression.

RESULTS:

The intervertebral disc compressive force and the low back moment were significantly greater in the group with low back pain than in the group without low back pain. The intervertebral disc compressive force was the factor most strongly associated with low back pain during static standing.

CONCLUSIONS:

Logistic regression analysis identified intervertebral disc compressive force as an independent variable associated with low back pain. This finding suggests that increased intervertebral disc compressive force may promote development of low back pain in standing posture.

Conflict of interest statement

KM and JK are share holders of Trunk Solution CO., Ltd. JK is a director of Trunk Solution CO., Ltd. KM is a adviser of Trunk Solution CO., Ltd. KM received the following support: grant support, including an endowed chair from Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Co., Ltd. and Okamura Corporation; grant support, including an endowed chair and lecture fees from AYUMI Pharmaceutical Corporation, Nippon Zoki Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Ono Pharmaceutical Co., LTD., Eli Lilly Japan K.K., Astellas Pharma Inc., TOTO LTD., and Eisai Co., Ltd.; lecture fees from Pfizer Japan Inc., Hisamitsu Pharmaceutical Co., Inc., Janssen Pharmaceutical K.K., Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., LTD., and Teijin Pharma Limited; and lecture fees and advisory fees from Shionogi & Co., Ltd., outside the submitted work. HO received grants from Teijin Pharma Limited, grants from Pfizer Inc., grants from Fujifilm Medical Co., Ltd., grants and personal fees from AYUMI Pharmaceutical Corporation, grants and personal fees from Nippon Zoki Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., grants and personal fees from Ono Pharmaceutical Co., LTD., grants from Eli Lilly Japan K.K. and Murata Manufacturing Co., Ltd. outside the submitted work. TF and JK received the following support: grant from Murata Manufacturing Co., Ltd. HO report grants from TEIJIN PHARMA LIMITED., grants from Pfizer Inc., grants from FUJIFILM Medical Co., Ltd., grants, personal fees from AYUMI Pharmaceutical Corporation, grants, personal fees from Nippon Zoki Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., grants, personal fees from ONO PHARMACEUTICAL CO., LTD., grants from Eli Lilly Japan K.K., outside the submitted work. This does not alter our adherence to PLOS ONE policies on sharing data and materials.

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