Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2018 Dec 17;8(1):17915. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-36244-z.

Free D-amino acids produced by commensal bacteria in the colonic lumen.

Author information

1
Dairy Science and Technology Institute, Kyodo Milk Industry Co. Ltd, Tokyo, Japan. m-matumoto@meito.co.jp.
2
Shimadzu Corporation, Kyoto, Japan.
3
Osaka University Shimadzu Analytical Innovation Research Laboratory, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan.
4
Dairy Science and Technology Institute, Kyodo Milk Industry Co. Ltd, Tokyo, Japan.
5
Osaka University Shimadzu Analytical Innovation Research Laboratory, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan. fukusaki@bio.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp.
6
Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan. fukusaki@bio.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

D-amino acids (D-AAs) have various biological activities, such as activation of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor as a co-agonist by D-Ser. Since several free D-AAs are released in the broth monocultured with bacterium and D-AAs are probably utilized for bacterial communication, we presume that intestinal microbiota releases several kinds of free D-AAs, which may be involved in the hosts' health. However, presently, only four free D-AAs have been found in the ceacal lumen, but not in the colonic lumen. Here, we showed, by simultaneous analysis of chiral AAs using high-sensitivity liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), that 12 free D-AAs (D-Ala, D-Arg, D-Asp, D-Gln, D-Glu, D-allo-Ile, D-Leu, D-Lys, D-Met, D-Phe, D-Ser, and D-Trp) are produced by intestinal microbiota and identified bacterial groups belonging to Firmicutes as the relevant bacterial candidates.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center