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Environ Int. 2019 Feb;123:310-317. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2018.12.012. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Ambient PM1 air pollution and cardiovascular disease prevalence: Insights from the 33 Communities Chinese Health Study.

Author information

1
Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution and Health Risk Assessment, Guangdong Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center of Environmental and Health risk Assessment, Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia.
3
Queensland University of Technology, International Laboratory for Air Quality & Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; Queensland University of Technology, Science and Engineering Faculty, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
4
Department of Environmental Health Sciences and Epidemiology and Biostatics, University at Albany, State University of New York, Rensselaer, NY, USA.
5
Institute and Clinic for Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Germany; Institute of Epidemiology, Helmholtz ZentrumMünchen-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany; Division of Metabolic and Nutritional Medicine, Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, Munich, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Munich, Germany.
6
Institute and Clinic for Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Germany; Comprehensive Pneumology Center Munich, German Center for Lung Research, Ziemssenstrasse 1, 80336 Muenchen, Germany.
7
Allergy and Lung Health Unit, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population & Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia.
8
School of Public Health, The University of Queensland, Herston, Queensland 4006, Australia.
9
Department of Geography and Resource Management, The Chinese University of Hong Kong; Stanley Ho Big Data Decision Analytics Research Centre, The Chinese University of Hong Kong; Institute of Environment, Energy and Sustainability, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong, China.
10
Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution and Health Risk Assessment, Guangdong Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center of Environmental and Health risk Assessment, Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China. Electronic address: donggh5@mail.sysu.edu.cn.

Abstract

BACKGROUNDS:

Evidence on the association between long-term exposure to particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is scarce in developing countries. Moreover, few studies assessed the role of the PM1 (≤1.0 μm) size fraction and CVD. We investigated the associations between PM1 and PM2.5 and CVD prevalence in Chinese adults.

METHODS:

In 2009, we randomly recruited 24,845 adults at the age of 18-74 years from 33 communities in Northeastern China. CVD status was determined by self-report of doctor-diagnosed CVD. Three-year (2006-08) average concentrations of PM1 and PM2.5 were assigned using a satellite-based exposure. We used spatial Generalized Linear Mixed Models to evaluate the associations between air pollutants and CVD prevalence, adjusting for multiple covariates. Stratified and interaction analyses and sensitivity analyses were also performed.

RESULTS:

A 10 μg/m3 increase in long-term exposure to ambient PM1 levels was associated a 12% higher odds for having CVD (OR = 1.12; 95% CI = 1.05-1.20). Compared to PM1, association between PM2.5 and CVD was lower (OR = 1.06; 95% CI = 1.01-1.11). No significant association was observed for PM1-2.5 (1-2.5 μm) size fraction (OR = 0.98; 95% CI = 0.85-1.13). Stratified analyses showed greater effect estimates in men and the elder.

CONCLUSIONS:

Long-term PM1 exposure was positively related to CVD, especially in men and the elder. In addition, PM1 may play a greater role than PM2.5 in associations with CVD. Further longitudinal studies are warranted to confirm our findings.

KEYWORDS:

Adults; Cardiovascular disease; Chinese; Cross-sectional study; Particulate matter

PMID:
30557810
DOI:
10.1016/j.envint.2018.12.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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