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Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2019 Jan;116:70-74. doi: 10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.10.025. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Maturation of auditory brainstem response in early term infants at 6 weeks and 9 months.

Author information

1
Children's Hospital Zhejiang University School of Medicine, China.
2
Children's Hospital Zhejiang University School of Medicine, China. Electronic address: 6198011@zju.edu.cn.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Emerging evidence indicates that infants who were born between 37 and 38 weeks of gestation are at higher risk of adverse long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. Yet little is known about the auditory neural maturation during the first year of their life.

AIM:

To compare the development of auditory brainstem response in early term (ET, 37-38 weeks gestational age, GA) and full term (FT, 39-41 weeks GA) infants.

METHODS:

126 infants received ABR testing at 6 weeks. 107 of them returned for the second assessment at 9 months, among which, 93 completed the ABR recordings. Comparison of the ABR variables were made depending on gestational age.

RESULTS:

Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to identify the differences in ABR outcomes between two groups. After controlling for confounders, latencies for wave III, V and I-III, III-V and I-V intervals were prolonged in ET group compared with FT group at 6 weeks (all p<0.03). ABR parameters of both groups developed as the infants got older. At 9 months, ET infants remain showing the longer wave V latency and I-V interval (all p < 0.02) than FT infants.

CONCLUSION:

During early postnatal life, ET has a different pattern of functional auditory brainstem development comparing with FT infants. The prolonged auditory conduction time suggests less mature of the central auditory system in ET infants before 9 months.

KEYWORDS:

Auditory brainstem response; Early term; Full term; Gestational age

PMID:
30554712
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.10.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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