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Environ Int. 2019 Jan;122:389-399. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2018.12.007. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Alkylphenolic compounds and risk of breast and prostate cancer in the MCC-Spain study.

Author information

1
Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology Department, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain; Unit of Molecular Epidemiology and Genetics in Infections and Cancer, IDIBELL, Catalan Institute of Oncology, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
2
Unit of Molecular Epidemiology and Genetics in Infections and Cancer, IDIBELL, Catalan Institute of Oncology, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública - CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain.
3
Institut Català de Seguretat i Salut Laboral, Departament de Treball, Afers Socials i Famílies, Generalitat de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain.
4
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública - CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain; Cancer Epidemiology Unit, National Center for Epidemiology, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Cardiovascular & Metabolic Diseases Unit, National Centre for Epidemiology, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
5
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública - CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain; Universidad de Cantabria - IDIVAL, Santander, Spain.
6
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Parc de Salut Mar Hospital del Mar, Barcelona, Spain; Medical Oncology Department, Parc de Salut Mar Hospital del Mar, Barcelona, Spain.
7
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública - CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain; Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, San Sebastian, Spain.
8
Department and Laboratory of Urology, Hospital Clínic, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
9
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública - CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain; Instituto de Salud Pública de Navarra - IdiSNA, Pamplona, Spain.
10
Centro de Investigación en Recursos Naturales, Salud y Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Huelva, Huelva, Spain.
11
Grupo de Investigación en Interacciones Gen-Ambiente y Salud (GIIGAS), Instituto de Biomedicina (IBIOMED), Universidad de León, León, Spain.
12
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública - CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain; Cancer and Public Health Area, FISABIO - Public Health, Valencia, Spain; General Directorate Public Health, Valencian Community, Valencia, Spain.
13
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública - CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain; Instituto de Oncología de Asturias (IUOPA), Área de Medicina Preventiva, Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.
14
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública - CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain; Cancer Epidemiology Unit, National Center for Epidemiology, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
15
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública - CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Granada, Granada, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Hospitales Universitarios de Granada, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
16
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública - CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain; Epidemiology Unit and Girona Cancer Registry (UERCG), Oncology Coordination Plan, Department of Health, Autonomous Government of Catalonia, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Girona, Spain; Girona Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBGI), University of Girona, Girona, Spain.
17
Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, San Sebastian, Spain.
18
Translational Genomics and Targeted Therapeutics in Solid Tumors, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
19
Cancer and Public Health Area, FISABIO - Public Health, Valencia, Spain.
20
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública - CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain; Epidemiology Section, Public Health Division, Department of Health of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
21
ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain; Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute - IMIM, Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain.
22
ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain; Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute - IMIM, Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain; National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece.
23
PATH, Seattle, USA.
24
Unit of Molecular Epidemiology and Genetics in Infections and Cancer, IDIBELL, Catalan Institute of Oncology, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: lcostas@iconcologia.net.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Alkylphenolic compounds are chemicals with endocrine disrupting properties that have been widely used in industry with important changes in their usage over time. Few epidemiologic studies have evaluated the effect of alkylphenolic compounds on human health.

OBJECTIVES:

We investigated whether occupational exposure to alkylphenolic compounds is associated with breast and prostate cancer.

METHODS:

We carried out a population-based case-control study including 1513 incident cases of breast cancer, 1095 of prostate cancer, and 3055 controls, frequency matched by sex, age and region. Occupational exposure to alkylphenolic compounds was estimated using a recently developed job-exposure matrix, which considered different scenarios of exposure and different subtypes of alkylphenolic compounds.

RESULTS:

History of occupational exposure to alkylphenolic compounds was modestly associated with breast cancer (OR = 1.23; 95% CI = 1.01-1.48). Within the different scenarios, the occupational use of domestic tensioactives was positively associated with breast cancer (OR = 1.28; 95% CI = 1.02-1.60), while occupational exposure in other scenarios showed mostly a suggestion of a similar positive associations. Exposure to nonylphenol ethoxylates was positively associated with breast cancer (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.00-1.47), while exposure to other compounds was uncommon. In general, we did not observe associations between alkylphenolic compounds and prostate cancer, except for a positive association among men occupationally exposed to cosmetic, hair and personal hygiene products.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings suggest a modest association between breast cancer risk and occupational exposure to alkylphenolic compounds, and no associations between these compounds and prostate cancer risk. These findings warrant further corroboration in other studies.

KEYWORDS:

Alkylphenolic compounds; Alkylphenols; Breast cancer; Job-exposure matrix; Occupational exposure; Prostate cancer

PMID:
30553564
DOI:
10.1016/j.envint.2018.12.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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