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Nat Rev Dis Primers. 2018 Dec 13;4(1):52. doi: 10.1038/s41572-018-0052-1.

Low back pain.

Author information

1
Research Group Health Psychology, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. johannes.vlaeyen@kuleuven.be.
2
Research Group Experimental Health Psychology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands. johannes.vlaeyen@kuleuven.be.
3
TRACE Center for Translational Health Research, KU Leuven - Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg, Genk, Belgium. johannes.vlaeyen@kuleuven.be.
4
Sydney School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia.
5
Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK.
6
Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Nuffield Division Anaesthetics, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK.
7
Department of Anesthesiology, Critical Care and Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg, Genk, Belgium.
8
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, Netherlands.
9
The Alan Edwards Centre for Research on Pain, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
10
Faculty of Health Sciences and Western's Bone and Joint Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
11
Research Group Experimental Health Psychology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands.
12
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands.
13
Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
14
Center for Muscle and Joint Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
15
Center for Health and Medical Psychology, School of Law, Psychology, and Social Work, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.

Abstract

Low back pain affects individuals of all ages and is a leading contributor to disease burden worldwide. Despite advancements in assessment and treatment methods, the management of low back pain remains a challenge for researchers and clinicians alike. One reason for the limited success in identifying effective treatments is the large variation in the manifestations, possible causes, precipitating and maintaining factors, course, prognosis and consequences in terms of activity interference and quality of life. However, despite these challenges, steady progress has been achieved in the understanding of back pain, and important steps in the understanding of the psychological and social risk factors, genetics and brain mechanisms of low back pain have been made. These new findings have given impetus to the development of new diagnostic procedures, evidence-based screening methods and more targeted interventions, which underscore the need for a multidisciplinary approach to the management of low back pain that integrates biological, psychological and social aspects.

PMID:
30546064
DOI:
10.1038/s41572-018-0052-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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