Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Patient Educ Couns. 2019 Apr;102(4):735-741. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2018.12.002. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

A randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy of a self-administered psycho-educational intervention for patients with cancer.

Author information

1
Departments of Educational and Counselling Psychology and of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; Louise Granofsky Psychosocial Oncology Program, Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Canada; Psychosocial Oncology Program, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada; Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Canada. Electronic address: annett.korner@mcgill.ca.
2
Counselling Services, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
3
Department of Mathematics and Statistics, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
4
Department of Psychology, The King's University, Edmonton, Canada.
5
Louise Granofsky Psychosocial Oncology Program, Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Canada; Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Canada; Departments of Psychology, Oncology and Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Bibliotherapy refers to psychological self-help interventions that utilize treatment books to improve psychological well-being. Research supports bibliotherapy as an efficacious intervention for a variety of mental health problems. Yet, few studies have investigated bibliotherapy in psychosocial oncology. The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to examine the efficacy of the NuCare intervention, delivered as a self-directed workbook, for enhancing empowerment, coping, and quality of life and reducing distress in patients with cancer.

METHODS:

Eighty-nine adult patients with cancer were randomized to receive the workbook for 6 weeks or the control condition, usual care. Participants completed questionnaires at baseline, 6 weeks post-baseline, and 10 weeks post-baseline.

RESULTS:

The increase of empowerment (main outcome) and quality of life and the decrease of distress in the NuCare group from pre-intervention to follow-up assessment differed significantly from the respective difference scores in the control group.

CONCLUSIONS:

The self-administered NuCare workbook is a potentially cost-effective, minimal intervention addressing psychosocial needs of patients with cancer.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Evidence-based bibliotherapy can empower patients and has the promise of reducing the burden on the healthcare system while enhancing the immediacy of psychosocial support.

KEYWORDS:

Bibliotherapy; Cancer; Distress; Empowerment; Quality of life; Randomized controlled trial; Self-care; Self-directed; Self-guided; Self-help; Self-management; Workbook

PMID:
30545649
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2018.12.002

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center