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J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Dec 10. pii: S0190-9622(18)33052-4. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2018.12.010. [Epub ahead of print]

Factors associated with suspected nonmelanoma skin cancers, dysplastic nevus, and cutaneous melanoma among first-time SPOTme screening program participants (2009-2010).

Author information

1
Tufts University School of Medicine, Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Boston, MA; Signature Healthcare Brockton Hospital, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Brockton, MA.
2
Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
3
Department of Public Health & Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Boston, MA.
4
Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston MA.
5
Dermatology Service of the Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, NY.
6
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Electronic address: ageller@hsph.harvard.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There have been no studies of the American Academy of Dermatology's SPOTme skin cancer screening program that have collectively analyzed the factors associated with suspected diagnoses of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), dysplastic nevus (DN), and cutaneous melanoma (CM).

OBJECTIVE:

Describe the demographics, risk factors, and access to care profile associated with suspected diagnoses of BCC, SCC, DN, and CM among first-time SPOTme screenees from 2009 to 2010.

METHODS:

We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of data from SPOTme skin cancer screenings conducted in 2009 and 2010. We performed multivariable logistic regression analysis for each diagnosis, incorporating traditional demographic, access to care, and risk factor variables in the models.

RESULTS:

Men, those without a regular dermatologist, persons reporting recently changing moles, and those with a personal history of melanoma were at increased risk for each of the suspected diagnoses analyzed. The uninsured were at increased risk for the suspected malignancies (BCC, SCC, and CM).

LIMITATIONS:

Lack of histological confirmation for diagnoses; cross-sectional design.

CONCLUSION:

Among first-time SPOTme participants, suspected diagnoses of BCC, SCC, DN, and CM shared several associated factors which may be considered when planning outreach and screening for populations at risk for skin cancer.

PMID:
30543833
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2018.12.010

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