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Mol Psychiatry. 2018 Dec 12. doi: 10.1038/s41380-018-0297-9. [Epub ahead of print]

Peer victimization and its impact on adolescent brain development and psychopathology.

Author information

1
Medical Research Council - Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. erin.quinlan@kcl.ac.uk.
2
Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK.
3
Institute of Science and Technology for Brain-Inspired Intelligence (ISTBI), Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
4
Key Laboratory of Computational Neuroscience and Brain-Inspired Intelligence (Fudan University), Ministry of Education, Shanghai, China.
5
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Square J5, 68159, Mannheim, Germany.
6
Discipline of Psychiatry, School of Medicine and Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
7
University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, House W34, 3.OG, Martini Street 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany.
8
Medical Research Council - Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK.
9
Department of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Square J5, Mannheim, Germany.
10
Department of Psychology, School of Social Sciences, University of Mannheim, 68131, Mannheim, Germany.
11
NeuroSpin, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191, Paris, France.
12
Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, 05405, USA.
13
Sir Peter Mansfield Imaging Centre School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, UK.
14
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charité Mitte, Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, Berlin, Germany.
15
Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig and Berlin, Germany.
16
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, INSERM Unit 1000 "Neuroimaging & Psychiatry", University Paris Sud, University Paris Descartes, Paris, France.
17
Maison de Solenn, Paris, France.
18
Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France.
19
Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest, Toronto, ON, M6A 2E1, Canada.
20
Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
21
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Centre Göttingen, von-Siebold Street 5, 37075, Göttingen, Germany.
22
Department of Psychiatry and Neuroimaging Center, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
23
School of Psychology and Global Brain Health Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.

Abstract

Chronic peer victimization has long-term impacts on mental health; however, the biological mediators of this adverse relationship are unknown. We sought to determine whether adolescent brain development is involved in mediating the effect of peer victimization on psychopathology. We included participants (n = 682) from the longitudinal IMAGEN study with both peer victimization and neuroimaging data. Latent profile analysis identified groups of adolescents with different experiential patterns of victimization. We then associated the victimization trajectories and brain volume changes with depression, generalized anxiety, and hyperactivity symptoms at age 19. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed time-by-victimization interactions on left putamen volume (F = 4.38, p = 0.037). Changes in left putamen volume were negatively associated with generalized anxiety (t = -2.32, p = 0.020). Notably, peer victimization was indirectly associated with generalized anxiety via decreases in putamen volume (95% CI = 0.004-0.109). This was also true for the left caudate (95% CI = 0.002-0.099). These data suggest that the experience of chronic peer victimization during adolescence might induce psychopathology-relevant deviations from normative brain development. Early peer victimization interventions could prevent such pathological changes.

PMID:
30542059
DOI:
10.1038/s41380-018-0297-9

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