Format

Send to

Choose Destination
World J Microbiol Biotechnol. 2018 Dec 10;35(1):2. doi: 10.1007/s11274-018-2573-x.

Isolation and characterization of mineral-dissolving bacteria from different levels of altered mica schist surfaces and the adjacent soil.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Agricultural and Environmental Microbiology, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, 210095, People's Republic of China.
2
Key Laboratory of Agricultural and Environmental Microbiology, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, 210095, People's Republic of China. xfsheng@njau.edu.cn.
3
Key Laboratory of Agricultural and Environmental Microbiology, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, 210095, People's Republic of China. helyan0794@njau.edu.cn.

Abstract

Microorganisms play important role in mineral weathering. However, little is known about rock-associated mineral-dissolving bacteria. In this study, 129 bacterial isolates were obtained from the less and more weathered mica schist surfaces and the adjacent soil and characterized for mineral dissolving activity, population, and the linkage of rock weathering level and distribution of the bacteria. Among the 129 isolates, 112 isolates could dissolve biotite. The relative abundance of the highly effective Fe solubilizers was significantly higher on the more altered rock surface (89.6%) than in the soil (51.2%) and on the less altered rock surface (22.5%), while the relative abundance of the highly effective Si solubilizers was significantly higher in the soil (65.9%) than on the more (41.7%) and less (12.5%) altered rock surfaces. Furthermore, 17.5-42.5%, 87.5%, and 60.9-90.2% of the highly effective acid- and siderophore-producing isolates were obtained in the less and more weathered rocks and the soil, respectively. The mineral-dissolving bacteria belonged to 18 genera and Burkholderia, Bacillus, and Paenibacillus were the dominant and highly effective mineral-dissolving bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis found 2, 9, and 5 bacterial species in the highly effective mineral-dissolving bacteria on the less and more altered rock surfaces and in the soil, respectively. The results showed the abundant and diverse mineral-dissolving bacterial populations on the more weathered rock surfaces. The results also suggested distinct mineral-dissolving activities and mechanisms of the bacteria and highlighted the possibility for the development of bacterial inocula for plant nutrition improvement in silicate mineral-rich soils.

KEYWORDS:

Mica schist; Mineral dissolving activity and mechanism; Mineral-dissolving bacteria; Population and diversity; Soil

PMID:
30536084
DOI:
10.1007/s11274-018-2573-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center