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Eur J Nutr. 2018 Dec 10. doi: 10.1007/s00394-018-1874-z. [Epub ahead of print]

Coffee and tea drinking in relation to the risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.

Author information

1
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Av Gran Via 199-203, 08908, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain. rzamora@idibell.cat.
2
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Av Gran Via 199-203, 08908, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain.
3
College of Medicine, Al Imam Mohammed Ibn Saud Islamic University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
4
Epidemiology Unit, Aviano Cancer Center, Milan, Italy.
5
Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
6
Malmö Diet and Cancer Study, University Hospital Malmö, Malmö, Sweden.
7
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
8
Department for Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
9
Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece.
10
School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.
11
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT, The Arctic University of Tromsø, Tromsö, Norway.
12
Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway.
13
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
14
Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
15
CESP, Université Paris-Sud, UVSQ, INSERM, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France.
16
Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.
17
Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
18
Unit of Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
19
CHU Rennes, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes, France.
20
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
21
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany.
22
Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece.
23
Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
24
Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy.
25
Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
26
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
27
Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Ragusa, Italy.
28
Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Città della Salute e della Scienza University-Hospital and University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
29
Department of Functional Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oviedo, Asturias, Spain.
30
Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.Granada, Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain.
31
CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
32
Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, Regional Government of the Basque Country, Donostia, Spain.
33
Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
34
Department of Health and Social Sciences, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia, Spain.
35
Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain.
36
Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdiSNA), Pamplona, Spain.
37
Nutrition Epidemiology Research Group, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
38
Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
39
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
40
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
41
Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
42
Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
43
MRC Epidemiology Unit, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
44
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
45
International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Coffee and tea constituents have shown several anti-carcinogenic activities in cellular and animal studies, including against thyroid cancer (TC). However, epidemiological evidence is still limited and inconsistent. Therefore, we aimed to investigate this association in a large prospective study.

METHODS:

The study was conducted in the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition) cohort, which included 476,108 adult men and women. Coffee and tea intakes were assessed through validated country-specific dietary questionnaires.

RESULTS:

During a mean follow-up of 14 years, 748 first incident differentiated TC cases (including 601 papillary and 109 follicular TC) were identified. Coffee consumption (per 100 mL/day) was not associated either with total differentiated TC risk (HRcalibrated 1.00, 95% CI 0.97-1.04) or with the risk of TC subtypes. Tea consumption (per 100 mL/day) was not associated with the risk of total differentiated TC (HRcalibrated 0.98, 95% CI 0.95-1.02) and papillary tumor (HRcalibrated 0.99, 95% CI 0.95-1.03), whereas an inverse association was found with follicular tumor risk (HRcalibrated 0.90, 95% CI 0.81-0.99), but this association was based on a sub-analysis with a small number of cancer cases.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this large prospective study, coffee and tea consumptions were not associated with TC risk.

KEYWORDS:

Coffee; Cohort; EPIC; Intake; Tea; Thyroid cancer

PMID:
30535794
DOI:
10.1007/s00394-018-1874-z

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