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Int J Public Health. 2019 May;64(4):487-498. doi: 10.1007/s00038-018-1188-1. Epub 2018 Dec 10.

Trends in sleeping difficulties among European adolescents: Are these associated with physical inactivity and excessive screen time?

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
2
Fund for Scientific Research Flanders (FWO), Brussels, Belgium.
3
Child and Adolescent Health Research Unit, School of Medicine, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, UK.
4
Faculdade de Motricidade Humana, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.
5
Department of Public Health and Paediatrics, University of Torino, Turin, Italy.
6
Department of Public Health and Epidemiology, Riga Stradins University, Riga, Latvia.
7
Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Research Centre for Health Promotion, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
8
Physical Activity, Nutrition and Health Research Unit, Faculty of Physical Education and Physical Therapy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
9
Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. b.declercq@ugent.be.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We examined changes in sleep-onset difficulties over time and associations with physical activity and screen time behavior among adolescents.

METHODS:

We used data from last four survey waves of the Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study (2002-2006-2010-2014). Multilevel logistic regression analyses were conducted to explore associations between regular sleeping difficulties, excessive screen time exposure and being insufficiently physically active (i.e., < 60 min daily) among 33 European and non-European countries.

RESULTS:

Findings indicate an increase in the prevalence of sleep-onset difficulties and in excessive screen time exposure and a small but significant increase in physical activity levels. Additionally, adolescents exceeding 2-h daily screen time had 20% higher odds of reporting sleep-onset difficulties, while no association was found for physical activity. The strength of the association between screen time and sleep-onset difficulties increased over time, which may reflect a change in type of screen time use (e.g., the increased use of easy accessible screens such as smartphones and tablets).

CONCLUSIONS:

Effective strategies to reduce screen time are key to reverse the detrimental trend in sleep-onset difficulties among adolescents.

KEYWORDS:

24-h approach; Adolescents; Physical activity; Sedentary behavior; Sleep; Trend

PMID:
30535677
DOI:
10.1007/s00038-018-1188-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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