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Sci Immunol. 2018 Dec 7;3(30). pii: eaat4579. doi: 10.1126/sciimmunol.aat4579. Epub 2018 Dec 7.

Neutrophils: New insights and open questions.

Author information

1
Division of Inflammation Biology, La Jolla Institute for Immunology, 9420 Athena Circle Drive, La Jolla, CA, USA. klaus@lji.org scatz@scripps.edu.
2
Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego,9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA, USA.
3
Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego and Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, CA, USA.
4
Immunology Research Group, Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
5
Department of Medicine, Section of General Pathology, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 4, 37134 Verona, Italy.
6
Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany.
7
Division of Inflammation Biology, La Jolla Institute for Immunology, 9420 Athena Circle Drive, La Jolla, CA, USA.
8
Department of Molecular Medicine, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA. klaus@lji.org scatz@scripps.edu.

Abstract

Neutrophils are the first line of defense against bacteria and fungi and help combat parasites and viruses. They are necessary for mammalian life, and their failure to recover after myeloablation is fatal. Neutrophils are short-lived, effective killing machines. Their life span is significantly extended under infectious and inflammatory conditions. Neutrophils take their cues directly from the infectious organism, from tissue macrophages and other elements of the immune system. Here, we review how neutrophils traffic to sites of infection or tissue injury, how they trap and kill bacteria, how they shape innate and adaptive immune responses, and the pathophysiology of monogenic neutrophil disorders.

PMID:
30530726
DOI:
10.1126/sciimmunol.aat4579

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