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Cell Signal. 2019 Feb;54:130-138. doi: 10.1016/j.cellsig.2018.12.002. Epub 2018 Dec 8.

A non-canonical JAGGED1 signal to JAK2 mediates osteoblast commitment in cranial neural crest cells.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: archana.kamalakar@emory.edu.
2
Department of Otolaryngology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: melissa.oh@emory.edu.
3
Department of Otolaryngology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: yvonne.stephenson@emory.edu.
4
Department of Otolaryngology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: samir.ballestas.naissir@emory.edu.
5
Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech College of Engineering, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: michael.davis@bme.gatech.edu.
6
Department of Orthopaedics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; The Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: nick.james.willett@emory.edu.
7
Department of Cell biology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; Department of Orthopaedics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; The Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: hicham.drissi@emory.edu.
8
Department of Otolaryngology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: steven.goudy@emory.edu.

Abstract

During craniofacial development, cranial neural crest (CNC) cells migrate into the developing face and form bone through intramembranous ossification. Loss of JAGGED1 (JAG1) signaling in the CNC cells is associated with maxillary hypoplasia or maxillary bone deficiency (MBD) in mice and recapitulates the MBD seen in humans with Alagille syndrome. JAGGED1, a membrane-bound NOTCH ligand, is required for normal craniofacial development, and Jagged1 mutations in humans are known to cause Alagille Syndrome, which is associated with cardiac, biliary, and bone phenotypes and these children experience increased bony fractures. Previously, we demonstrated deficient maxillary osteogenesis in Wnt1-cre;Jagged1f/f (Jag1CKO) mice by conditional deletion of Jagged1 in maxillary CNC cells. In this study, we investigated the JAG1 signaling pathways in a CNC cell line. Treatment with JAG1 induced osteoblast differentiation and maturation markers, Runx2 and Ocn, respectively, Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP) production, as well as classic NOTCH1 targets, Hes1 and Hey1. While JAG1-induced Hes1 and Hey1 expression levels were predictably decreased after DAPT (NOTCH inhibitor) treatment, JAG1-induced Runx2 and Ocn levels were surprisingly constant in the presence of DAPT, indicating that JAG1 effects in the CNC cells are independent of the canonical NOTCH pathway. JAG1 treatment of CNC cells increased Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) phosphorylation, which was refractory to DAPT treatment, highlighting the importance of the non-canonical NOTCH pathway during CNC cells osteoblast commitment. Pharmacologic inhibition of JAK2 phosphorylation, with and without DAPT treatment, upon JAG1 induction reduced ALP production and, Runx2 and Ocn gene expression. Collectively, these data suggest that JAK2 is an essential component downstream of a non-canonical JAG1-NOTCH1 pathway through which JAG1 stimulates expression of osteoblast-specific gene targets in CNC cells that contribute to osteoblast differentiation and bone mineralization.

KEYWORDS:

JAK2; Maxillary bone disease; Maxillary development; Non-canonical JAGGED1 signaling; Osteoblast commitment

PMID:
30529759
PMCID:
PMC6420215
[Available on 2020-02-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.cellsig.2018.12.002

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