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Neuroscience. 2019 Feb 1;398:126-143. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2018.11.047. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Developmental Changes in EEG Phenotypes in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome.

Author information

1
Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521, USA.
2
Psychology Department and Psychology Graduate Program, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521, USA.
3
Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521, USA; Division of Biomedical Sciences, School of Medicine, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521, USA.
4
Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521, USA; Psychology Department and Psychology Graduate Program, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521, USA. Electronic address: khaleel@ucr.edu.

Abstract

Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is a leading genetic cause of autism and intellectual disabilities. Sensory-processing deficits are common in humans with FXS and an animal model, the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse, manifesting in the auditory system as debilitating hypersensitivity and abnormal electroencephalographic (EEG) and event-related potential (ERP) phenotypes. FXS is a neurodevelopmental disorder, but how EEG/ERP phenotypes change during development is unclear. Therefore, we characterized baseline and stimulus-evoked EEG in auditory and frontal cortex of developing (postnatal day (P) 21 and P30) and adult (P60) wildtype (WT) and Fmr1 KO mice with the FVB genetic background. We found that baseline gamma-band power and N1 amplitude of auditory ERP were increased in frontal cortex of Fmr1 KO mice during development and in adults. Baseline gamma power was increased in auditory cortex at P30. Genotype differences in stimulus-evoked gamma power were present in both cortical regions, but the direction and strength of the changes were age-dependent. These findings suggest that cortical deficits are present during early development and may contribute to sensory-processing deficits in FXS, which in turn may lead to anxiety and delayed language. Developmental changes in EEG measures indicate that observations at a single time-point during development are not reflective of FXS disease progression and highlight the need to identify developmental trajectories and optimal windows for treatment.

KEYWORDS:

EEG; Fragile X Syndrome; gamma oscillations; neurodevelopmental disorders; sensory hypersensitivity

PMID:
30528856
PMCID:
PMC6331246
[Available on 2020-02-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuroscience.2018.11.047
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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