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Hepatobiliary Pancreat Dis Int. 2019 Feb;18(1):19-27. doi: 10.1016/j.hbpd.2018.11.002. Epub 2018 Nov 22.

Gut microbial dysbiosis associates hepatocellular carcinoma via the gut-liver axis.

Author information

1
Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, #79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou 310003, China; Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003, China; Health Management Center, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou 310003, China.
2
Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, #79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou 310003, China; Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003, China.
3
Department of Infectious Disease, Precision Medicine Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, China.
4
Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, #79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou 310003, China; Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003, China. Electronic address: shusenzheng@zju.edu.cn.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies in the world. Gut microbiota has been demonstrated to play a critical role in liver inflammation, chronic fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, and HCC development through the gut-liver axis.

DATA SOURCES:

Recently there have been several innovative studies investigating gut microbial dysbiosis-mediated enhancement of HCC through the gut-liver axis. Literatures from January 1998 to January 2018 were searched in the PubMed database using the keywords "gut microbiota" and "hepatocellular carcinoma" or "liver cancer", and the results of experimental and clinical studies were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Gut microbial dysbiosis accompanies the progression of alcoholic liver disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and liver cirrhosis, and promotes HCC progression in an experimental mouse model. The immune system and key factors such as Toll-like receptor 4 are involved in the process. There is evidence for gut microbial dysbiosis in hepatitis virus-related HCC patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

Gut microbial dysbiosis is closely associated with hepatic inflammation disease and HCC through the gut-liver axis. With the enhanced understanding of the interactions between gut microbiota and liver through the gut-liver axis, new treatment strategies for HCC are being developed.

KEYWORDS:

Gut microbiota; Gut-liver axis; Hepatocellular carcinoma; Lipopolysaccharide; Toll-like receptor 4

PMID:
30527903
DOI:
10.1016/j.hbpd.2018.11.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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